Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve

(redirected from Charley Wild River)

Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve

Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve, 2,526,512 acres (1,022,879 hectares), E central Alaska. The preserve, which protects the two river basins, near the Canadian border, contains paleontological and archeological sites, as well as old cabins and relics from the gold rush of 1898. Proclaimed a national monument in 1978, it was designated a national preserve in 1980. The 88-mi (142-km) Charley Wild River, authorized in 1980, lies entirely within the preserve. See National Parks and Monuments (table).
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Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve

Address:4175 Geist Rd
Fairbanks, AK 99709

Phone:907-457-5752
Fax:907-455-0601
Web: www.nps.gov/yuch/
Size: 2,526,512 acres.
Established: Proclaimed Yukon-Charley National Monument on December 1, 1978; established as a national preserve on December 2, 1980.
Location:115 miles of the 1,800-mile Yukon River and the entire Charley River basin along the Canadian border in east-central Alaska. There is no road access, but two highways serve towns near the Preserve boundaries. The 161-mile Taylor Hwy. begins at Tetlin Junction on the Alaska Highway and ends at Eagle, 12 miles from the preserve. The 162-mile Steese Hwy. begins in Fairbanks and end in Circle, 14 miles from the preserve. Scheduled air taxis from Fairbanks serve Eagle and Circle, located upriver and downriver of the preserve, respectively.
Facilities:Visitor center, public use cabins.
Activities:Camping, hiking, boating, rafting, kayaking, canoeing, fishing, hunting, bird-watching, interpretive programs.
Special Features:Most visitors to the preserve float the Yukon or Charley rivers. The Charley, an 88-mile wild river, is considered by many to be the most spectacular river in Alaska. Numerous rustic cabins and historic sites on the preserve are reminders of the importance of the Yukon River during the 1898 Gold Rush. Paleontological and archeological sites here add much to our knowledge of man and his environment thousands of years ago.

See other parks in Alaska.
Parks Directory of the United States, 5th Edition. © 2007 by Omnigraphics, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Gauley River National Recreation Area in West Virginia, the Obed Wild and Scenic River in Tennessee, the Charley Wild River in Alaska, and the Colorado in Grand Canyon National Park all offer class IV and V rapids to boaters.