Charmat process

Charmat process

[shär′mä ‚präs·əs]
(food engineering)
A bulk process for making champagne in which the wine undergoes secondary fermentation in a glass-lined vat instead of in a bottle.
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Wine sparkling can be attributed to the CO 2 content as a result of direct injection, natural fermentation via the traditional method, or even by way of a large tank built to withstand the pressure of the Charmat process. The FactMR forecast report on global sparkling wine market estimates it to record a sluggish CAGR from 2017-2022 and be worth just under US$ 44 billion by 2022.
Although this figure is not further broken down by type of sparkler--and includes traditional bottle-fermented (methode cbampenoise), bulk fermented (Charmat process) and carbonated grape and fruit wines and sparkling ciders--it does indicate that 8.4% of the 7,600 wineries in the United States, Canada and Mexico are selling some sort of sparkling wine.
Production in 2011 was about 16m bottles, and the company plans to nearly double the figure by 2015 as well as increasing the share of high-value achampagne' style output (matured for up to 3 years in bottles) compared with output using the much faster Charmat process. Our DCF model is more conservative, assuming 10% CAGR to 23.5m bottles by 2016.
In the Charmat process, instead of having the secondary alcoholic fermentation take place in the bottle, it takes place in large steel tanks that are specially designed to withstand the pressure produced by fermentation.
Producers get the bubbles - actually carbon dioxide - into wine in a number of different ways: for example, via natural secondary fermentation in the bottle (as with the Champagne method) or in a large tank (the less-expensive Charmat process).
Prosecco is produced via the charmat process, wherein the secondary fermentation occurs in stainless steel tanks, using a white grape variety native to the Veneto region of Northeast Italy.
The majority of sparkling wine is made by the Charmat process or "bulk" process developed by the French winemaker Charmat in 1907 (Figure 3-28).
Wine sparkling can be attributed to the CO2 content as a result of direct injection, natural fermentation via the traditional method, or even by way of a large tank built to withstand the pressure of the Charmat process. The Fact.MR forecast report on global sparkling wine market estimates it to record a sluggish CAGR from 2017-2022 and be worth just under US$ 44 billion by 2022.
Pressuretank: If a winemaker wants to make sparkling wine using the Charmat process (see "Charmat, Why Not?" on page 49), this pressure tank has been PED tested at 3, 6 and 9 bars.
Charmat process (shar-MAHT) A method of sparkling wine production where the secondary fermentation takes place in tanks rather than in the bottle.
My work with Della Toffola, which is located in Veneto, near the region of Prosecco, has gotten me thinking about a high-quality California Charmat process sparkling wine.