Charybdis


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Charybdis

(kərĭb`dĭs), in Greek mythology, a female monster. Because she stole Hercules' cattle, Zeus hurled her into the sea. There she lay under rocks across from Scylla and sucked in and spewed out huge amounts of water, creating a whirlpool.
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Charybdis

[kə′rib·dəs]
(oceanography)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Charybdis

Poseidon’s daughter; monster of the deep. [Gk. Lit.: Odyssey; Rom. Lit.: Aeneid]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Charybdis

a ship-devouring monster in classical mythology, identified with a whirlpool off the north coast of Sicily, lying opposite Scylla on the Italian coast
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

CHARYBDIS

(mathematics, tool)
A Lisp program to display mathematical expressions. It is related to MATHLAB.

[Sammet 1969, p. 522].
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)
References in periodicals archive ?
Antimicrobial Proteins from the Crab Charybdis lucifera (Fabricius, 1798).
Since writing about the MACRA bureaucracy, and the Morton's Choice facing private practitioners between Scylla (the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System) and Charybdis (the still largely undefined Alternative Payment Models), a question I've been hearing with increasing frequency is whether it wouldn't be better to simply opt out of Medicare participation entirely.
Parasite of Charybdis feriatus has been identified as Micippion asymmetricus Shiino (1942) on the basis of epicraidean larvae's 6th pareopod size and shape.
But with conditions roughening and Scylla drifting off the best line, Charybdis suddenly started moving back, first overlapping and then taking a length in just 25 strokes.
How did these courts respond to the overwhelming cultural impulses as 'neutral' neighbors, allies, or even as enemies, in a figurative sense navigating beyond the dangers of the mythic whirlpool of Charybdis and the rock on the opposite side, the home of the fearful monster Scylla?
As the Odyssey's Circe turns from treacherous witch to helpful advisor and takes it upon herself to warn Odysseus against, first, the Sirens, and, second, the twin dangers that are Scylla and Charybdis, she curiously does not immediately proceed to discuss the latter pair.
One of resourceful Odyssey's obstacles on his way back home to Ithaca was the legendary monsters Scylla and Charybdis. Odyssey had two options but, in reality, only one: disaster.
Bassel, 'Between Scylla and Charybdis: Enterprise and Austerity as a Double Hazard for Non-Governmental Organisations in France and the UK', CERES Briefing 2, March 2013; and Women's Resource Centre, The impact of public spending cuts on women's voluntary and community organisations in London, March 2013.
Drury evades both the Scylla of popularising his subject for an audience whose interests are religious only, and the Charybdis of abstract sociological analysis riddled by jargon, which is surely inappropriate here.
In this case, Scylla and Charybdis take the form of: