Cheeryble Brothers

Cheeryble Brothers

noble, generous twins. [Br. Lit.: Nicholas Nickleby]
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Other Ramsbottom mill owners, Daniel and William Grant (Dickens's models for the Cheeryble brothers in Nicholas Nickleby), also gave him work.
Nicholas reclaims the family's independence from his uncle, obtaining work with the portly and doting Cheeryble brothers (Timothy Spall, Gerard Horan).
Likewise the Crummleses, with Lane and Humphries (better known as Dame Edna) having a royal good time; and the Cheeryble brothers, played like a fussily paternal Tweedledee and Tweedledum.
After disabling one of her pursuers he finds work with the generous Cheeryble brothers, and his fortunes improve, so that he is able to provide a home for his mother and sister.
After Nicholas goes to work for the Cheeryble brothers, her future becomes secure.
Frank Cheeryble, the gentlemanly nephew of the Cheeryble brothers.
The Cheeryble brothers gave Nicholas a job in their countinghouse at a decent salary, rented him a cottage reasonably, and helped him to furnish it for himself, Kate, and their mother.
As if Ralph Nickleby's fortunes were all against him, an old employee appeared and revealed to the Cheeryble brothers that Smike had been Ralph's son.
Nicholas thought that Frank Cheeryble was in love with Madeline; he asked the Cheeryble brothers to see that she was taken care of elsewhere.
This novel, which also contains the Cheeryble brothers, the first of a series of exceptionally virtuous characters, was the first of Dickens' novels to have a truly complex plot.