Chekhov


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Chekhov

, Chekov
Anton Pavlovich. 1860--1904, Russian dramatist and short-story writer. His plays include The Seagull (1896), Uncle Vanya (1900), The Three Sisters (1901), and The Cherry Orchard (1904)

Chekhov

 

(until 1954, Lopasnia), a city under oblast jurisdiction and administrative center of Chekhov Raion, Moscow Oblast, RSFSR. Situated on the Moscow-Simferopol’ highway; railway station 77 km from Moscow. Population, 43,000 (1974). Chekhov’s industrial plants include a power engineering machine-building plant, a regeneration plant, the Gidrostal’konstruktsiia Plant, printing and furniture combines, a mixed-feed plant, and a candy factory. The city was renamed in honor of A. P. Chekhov. A literary museum-preserve memorializing the writer is located at Melikhovo, 12 km from the city.

REFERENCE

Prokin, A., and Iu. Solov’ev. Gorod Chekhov i ego okrestnosti. Moscow, 1977.

Chekhov

 

(until 1947, Noda), a city in Kholmsk Raion, Sakhalin Oblast, RSFSR. Situated on the western coast of southern Sakhalin Island, along the Sea of Japan (Tatar Strait). Railway station. The city has a cellulose and paper plant, a ship repair plant, a wine and vodka plant, and a milk plant. There is also a fishing kolkhoz in the city.

References in periodicals archive ?
By picking out selected reference points from the Chekhov text and weaving them throughout her similarly tragically comic monologue, Carr has created a true companion to the original piece, leaving you in no doubt that these two were perfectly matched.
Claiming to be an actor himself, his character Max tells Julie: "Next to Gorbachev, (Chekhov) was my favourite Russian."
Chekhov drew on memories of debt and crisis from his own childhood, giving his tale a compelling authenticity.
In the application of new techniques to Chekhov's language, scholars have been less successful.
| In and Out of Chekhov's Shorts is coming to Loughborough Town Hall.
The characters switch to Russian for one clever nod to a section of Chekhov's original play, which saw them speak in English.
From the beginning of the book -- concerned as it is with the relationship between life and art, truth and performance -- there are hints that Chekhov is going to be important.
Even if the complicated brew of emotions cannot always match Chekhov's, there are still moments of great power here.--BE
Opening at the Royal Exchange this week, Chekhov's revered 1900 work - a bleak exploration of thwarted hopes in a provincial Russian town - will be gloriously re-imagined with electric guitars, punk rock spirit and RashDash's trademark feminist zeal.
In Doubles, Ergi Kirkin (Tur)/Nikolay Vyleghanin (Rus) bt Aqeel Khan (Pak)/Shahzad Khan (Pak) 6-4,6-4; Gleb Alekseenko (Ukr)/Ivan Ponomarenko (Rus) bt Shalva Dzhanashiya (Rus)/Ivan Nedelko (Rus) 4-2 ret.; Enrique Lopez-Perez(Esp)/Kristian Lozan (Rus) bt Parameer Singh Bajwa (Ind)/Ajay Prithvi Nemakal (Ind) 6-2,6-1; Peter Goldsteiner (Aut)/Julian Onken (Ger) bt Anurag Nenwani (Ind)/Jayesh Pungliya (Ind) 6-0,6-3; Enrique Lopez-Perez (Esp) bt Julian Onken (Ger) 6-2,6-4; Ergi Kirkin (Tur)/Nikolay Vylegzhanin (Rus) bt Vadim Alekseenko (Ukr)/Anton Chekhov (Rus) 7-5,2-6.
Semi-finals: 2-Anton Chekhov (Russia)/Alexandr Lebedyn (Ukraine) bt 3-Shalva Dzhanashia (Russia)/Ivan Nedelko (Russia) 2-6, 6-4, 10-8; Aqeel Khan (Pakistan)/Shahzad Khan (Pakistan) bt Ergi Kirkin (Turkey)/Nikolay Vylegzahnin (Russia) 6-4, 7-6(3).