Chekhov

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Chekhov

, Chekov
Anton Pavlovich. 1860--1904, Russian dramatist and short-story writer. His plays include The Seagull (1896), Uncle Vanya (1900), The Three Sisters (1901), and The Cherry Orchard (1904)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Chekhov

 

(until 1954, Lopasnia), a city under oblast jurisdiction and administrative center of Chekhov Raion, Moscow Oblast, RSFSR. Situated on the Moscow-Simferopol’ highway; railway station 77 km from Moscow. Population, 43,000 (1974). Chekhov’s industrial plants include a power engineering machine-building plant, a regeneration plant, the Gidrostal’konstruktsiia Plant, printing and furniture combines, a mixed-feed plant, and a candy factory. The city was renamed in honor of A. P. Chekhov. A literary museum-preserve memorializing the writer is located at Melikhovo, 12 km from the city.

REFERENCE

Prokin, A., and Iu. Solov’ev. Gorod Chekhov i ego okrestnosti. Moscow, 1977.

Chekhov

 

(until 1947, Noda), a city in Kholmsk Raion, Sakhalin Oblast, RSFSR. Situated on the western coast of southern Sakhalin Island, along the Sea of Japan (Tatar Strait). Railway station. The city has a cellulose and paper plant, a ship repair plant, a wine and vodka plant, and a milk plant. There is also a fishing kolkhoz in the city.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Distance, in a Chekovian way, makes the observer aware of almost infinite perspectives on life.
Ceylan dedicates the film to Chekhov, and there's certainly something Chekovian about it, with "The Cherry Orchard" the obvious point of reference.
Reading most of the critical works about Wilson, one encounters recurrent phrases like "Chekovian lyrical realism," Circle Rep's trademark aesthetic.
3 This suggests one reason why an Off-Broadway house like the Phoenix could undertake a serious revival of the play as recently as 1961, and Richard Watts, in a review of that production, could write of the script as Chekovian. See "The Plays and Their Authors," Best Plays of the Early American Theatre, ed.
Wearing his Chekovian beard, Rowan gave Richard a slight limp and hunch; although he addressed the audience directly, there was little of Cox's gleeful engaging of their confidence.
But, take away the skinny-dipping and what you've got is simply a Chekovian stage play - spare, terse and elegiac but, unless you know anything about the subject, also rather dry and dull.