Chelm


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Chełm

(khĕlm), Rus. Kholm, city (1994 est. pop. 67,900), Lubelskie prov., E Poland. It is a railway junction and has industries manufacturing metals, lumber, machinery, cement, and liquors. An old Slavic settlement, Chełm was chartered in 1233. It passed to Poland in 1377, to Austria in 1795, and to Russia in 1815. The Treaty of Brest-Litovsk (1918) transferred the city to Ukraine, but it passed to Poland in 1921. After Chełm was freed from German occupation in World War II, the new Polish republic was proclaimed there (July 22, 1944) by the Polish Committee of National Liberation. Chełm is noted for its cathedral.

Chełm

 

a city in eastern Poland. Administrative center of Chełm Województwo. Population, 46,000 (1974). Chełm is a railroad junction. It produces approximately 4 million tons of cement annually. The food-processing industry is represented by flour mills and a distillery producing liqueurs and spirits. The city also produces glass and agricultural machinery. Chalk is quarried in the area.

Chelm

mythical place inhabited by amiable simpletons. [Jew. Folklore: Rosten, 84]
References in periodicals archive ?
But the people of Chelm, whose Jewish community once numbered 18,000, have not forgotten.
Chelm, then a town of 30,000, was caught in the middle.
Leo Shatin, the author of Simple Wisdom, has updated the Chelm stories by emphasizing the wisdom of its tales but at the expense of its humor.