natural abundance

(redirected from Chemical abundance)

natural abundance

[′nach·rəl ə′bən·dəns]
(nucleonics)
The abundance ratio of an isotope in a naturally occurring terrestrial sample of an element.
References in periodicals archive ?
For the first time, Bergemann's team presented detailed chemical abundance patterns of these halo stars using the W.
They also observed Kronos' strikingly unusual chemical abundance pattern.
In 2007 Jorge Melendez (Centro de Astrofisica da Universidade do Porto, Portugal) and Ivan Ramirez (Max-Planck-Institut fur Astrophysik, Germany) identified two magnitude-8 solar twin candidates with even better chemical abundance matches to the Sun than 18 Sco.
In the frameworks of the Gaia-ESO and HERMES surveys, international research teams will decipher the information and derive precise chemical abundances and stellar parameters with unprecedently large statistics.
The closing papers describe the large millimeter telescope (LMT) project in Mexico, the planet hunting and astero-seismology explorer spectrophotometer (PHASES) project, the Cananea high resolution spectrograph for determining stellar chemical abundances, and the scintillator cosmic ray super telescope.
The fundamental observations that corroborate the Big Bang are the cosmic microwave radiation and the chemical abundances of the light elements described in the Big Bang nucleosynthesis theory.
Chemical abundances in meteorites suggest that the birth of our own solar system may have been triggered by a shock wave from a supernova.
The team next aims to make water-abundance measurements for different planets to explore their chemical abundances.
With a better handle on the star's brightness Bond's team refined the star's age by applying contemporary theories about the star's burn rate, chemical abundances, and internal structure.
He finds that the Sun's birth cluster started with about 500 to 3,000 solar masses and a diameter smaller than about 20 light-years, from evidence preserved in the dynamics and chemical abundances in the solar system's outer Kuiper Belt.
Line profiles can be used to determine chemical abundances as well as temperature.
It can also provide spectral information to determine the temperature, density, and chemical abundances of the emitting gas.

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