oscillatory reaction

(redirected from Chemical clock)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

oscillatory reaction

[′äs·ə·lə‚tȯr·ē rē′ak·shən]
(chemistry)
A chemical reaction in which a variable of a chemical system exhibits regular periodic changes in time or in space.
References in periodicals archive ?
One laboratory instance of this self-organization is a chemical clock, which Prigogine and Stengers describe by saying:
(300) In eschewing hierarchy and externally imposed orders and logics, Prigogine and Stengers present an image of systemic interaction in accord with that endorsed by feminist philosophers of science, but contrary to many people's understanding of how science "is." Therefore, Prigogine and Stengers seem to feel they must assure the reader that chemical clocks are real:
The bioelastic polymer would contain a "chemical clock" that would cause the material to release the pharmaceutical.
And he found it was able to alter the chemical clocks ticking away in every cell of our body.
Chemical clocks are running in every cell in the body and are set by the master clock in the brain.
Although it doesn't feel like it to us, the days are getting longer and in the bird world, chemical clocks are kicking in, causing them to sing and in some cases gather nesting materials.
Activities included dyes and dyeing, making chemical clocks change colour to music, science past and present, chemistry applied to forensic science techniques related to fingerprinting, a site tour which included practical activities and making a proposal for a new chemical plant at Uniqema and Huntsman Polyurethanes.
Among the activities the pupils took part in were learning how to make chemical clocks which change colour in time to music.