Chemin des Dames


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Chemin des Dames

(shəmăN` dā däm) [Fr.,=ladies' road], road running along a crest between the Aisne and Ailette rivers, N France. Built during Roman times, the road was the site of the battle (57 B.C.) in which Julius Caesar defeated the Gauls. Chemin des Dames received its name in the 18th cent. when Louis XV's daughters traveled along the road to Bove Castle with their ladies-in-waiting. During World War I the Germans held the road.
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'Empirical evidence suggests Cambodians fought for France in the region of Champagne as well as at the battle of the Chemin des Dames and on the battlefront of Macedonia in 1917,' said Mathilde Teruya, political press counsellor for the French embassy in Cambodia.
The aim of the campaign was for the British Army to operate diversionary attacks near Arras to draw German troops away from the main target, which was the Chemin des Dames Ridge, near Champagne.
First, for those (http://www.ibtimes.com/battlefield-1-will-get-new-nighttime-map-june-2523738) who missed the official details , Nivelle Nights takes players to Chemin des Dames as it appeared in 1917.
"It's a sad day for Alberto and for team to miss a rider but we have to stay focused." Hollande visit As French President Francois Hollande joined Tour boss Christian Prudhomme in his car, crosswinds on the Chemin des Dames ridge-scene of three World War One battles-split the peloton.
l VENDRESSE IT was in this area near the Chemin des Dames that soldiers arrived exhausted after the Battle of Mons.
Stages six and seven visit Arras, the Chemin des Dames, Verdun and Douaumont - all sites of key battles and home to memorials to the fallen - and a finish in Reims, in Champagne country, where French kings were once crowned.
My final call was to the sinister-sounding Caverne du Dragon, which houses the Museum of the Chemin des Dames.
That had not been so in 1917, when General Robert Nivelle ordered a massive assault on Chemin des Dames, during the Second Battle of the Aisne.
He fought at Reims and Saint Quentin but was shot in the knee at Chemin Des Dames and sent home.
One wonders why he was not sacked then the way Nivelle was after Chemin des Dames. The year 1917 was a disastrous one of aimless attrition and battlemania; mutinies in the French army meant "the virtual collapse of France's offensive capability," to which Britain was not immune--twenty thousand men mutinied at the Etaples base camp, the object of a cover-up then and long after, not mentioned here nor in histories like John Keegan's The First World War (116).

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