Chenla


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Chenla

 

a state of the mid-sixth to the eighth century that was formed by Mon-Khmer tribes living along the middle course of the Mekong River. Chenla, first mentioned as a vassal state of Funan, was situated southwest of Lin-Yi (Champa). Isanavarman I (ruled early seventh century to c. 635) conquered Funan, having extended his authority westward to Angkor, and founded the capital of Chenla at Isanapura, on the Stung Sen. Under Jayavarman I (ruled early eighth century), the last ruler of Chenla, the state split into rival principalities. The culture of Chenla is represented by brick temples, remarkable sculpture, and numerous epigraphs in Old Khmer and Sanskrit that have been preserved.

REFERENCE

Migot, A. Kkhmery. Moscow, 1973. (Translated from French.)
References in periodicals archive ?
The first is Michael Vickery s reinterpretation of the so-called Chenla period inscriptions (Vickery 1998).
The archaeological sites of protohistoric Chenla present a complete contrast to the Iron Age moated settlements, most of which were by now abandoned.
Thus a web of social and economic characteristics identified in the Chenla texts resonate with the late prehistoric Iron Age: elite individuals, weavers, potters and smiths, as well as bounded rice fields and water control.
The protohistoric sequel, the Chenla period 550-800 AD, is illuminated by three sources of information: archaeological, epigraphic and documentary.
The first four cover the prehistoric Iron Age, followed by the period of Chenla and, finally, the first dynasty of Angkor (Figure 2).
The Chenla has been annexed by an ugly, circular restaurant.
A good example is perhaps the Chenla, Lu Ban Hap's eccentric, abstract theatre where Sihanouk hosted his so-called international film festivals.
The Kentfield Collection Chenla Table Lamp, $1,325 Striking white glass Lamp designed by Jiun Ho for Boyd Lighting.
The 'Development of states' (Chapter 7) comprises the early histories of Funan, Chenla, Dvaravati and Champa during the first millennium AD; the story is completed by Chapter 8 with an excellent overview of Angkor Wat until 1431.
In Cambodia, the early historic or Funan period (second to sixth centuries AD) and pre-Angkorian or Chenla period (sixth to eighth centuries AD) (Stark 2004: 97-101) saw the expansion of formalised settlements and increased regional interaction over territories that would become the heart of the Khmer Empire.
Michael Vickery, through a series of papers published over the past 25 years, has threatened to create a seismic change in our understanding of the so-called Chenla Period, the vital stage in the development of the civilization of Angkor.
Another reveals that missions were sent to China by a number of polities conquered by Chenla, the power that superseded Funan in Cambodia, after AD 650-56 (Tuan-Lin 1876).