Chenla


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Chenla

 

a state of the mid-sixth to the eighth century that was formed by Mon-Khmer tribes living along the middle course of the Mekong River. Chenla, first mentioned as a vassal state of Funan, was situated southwest of Lin-Yi (Champa). Isanavarman I (ruled early seventh century to c. 635) conquered Funan, having extended his authority westward to Angkor, and founded the capital of Chenla at Isanapura, on the Stung Sen. Under Jayavarman I (ruled early eighth century), the last ruler of Chenla, the state split into rival principalities. The culture of Chenla is represented by brick temples, remarkable sculpture, and numerous epigraphs in Old Khmer and Sanskrit that have been preserved.

REFERENCE

Migot, A. Kkhmery. Moscow, 1973. (Translated from French.)
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
An archeological team has found a metre-long tipless stone linga (penis) of the Hindu deity Shiva in the foundations of a temple in Kratie province's historical Samphu Borak area, a former capital of the pre-Angkor Empire Chenla period.
The sites are the Cambodia's archaeological site of Sambor Prei Kuk, the capital of the Chenla Empire that flourished in the late 6th and early 7th centuries CE, China's Kulangsu which is a tiny island located on the estuary of the Chiu-lung River, and India's walled city of Ahmadabad, founded by Sultan Ahmad Shah in the 15th century.
Briggs, 'The ancient Khmer Empire', Transactions of the American Philosophical Society 41, 1 (1951): 1-295; Coedes, The Indianized states of Southeast Asia; Vickery, Society, economics, and politics; Michael Vickery, 'Funan reviewed: Deconstructing the ancients', BEFEO 90-91 (2003-4): 101-43; Michael Vickery, 'What and where was Chenla?', in Recherches nouvelles sur le Cambodge, ed.
The Chinese records of that time usually referred to Cambodia as Zhenla (also written "Chenla"), the name of an ancient state that ceased to exist in the seventh century, which occupied the eastern part of the later Cambodia.
The Kentfield Collection Chenla Table Lamp, $1,325 Striking white glass Lamp designed by Jiun Ho for Boyd Lighting.
A good example is perhaps the Chenla, Lu Ban Hap's eccentric, abstract theatre where Sihanouk hosted his so-called international film festivals.
Cambodian archaeologists have unearthed the remnants of nearly 100 previously undiscovered temples dating from the 6th and 7th centuries in Kratie province's historical Samphu Borak area, former capital of the pre-Angkor Empire Chenla period.
(54) Unlike Funan and the later Zhenia (Chenla) to the southeast and east of the UMRV, Dvaravati predominantly utilises Buddhist, and to a lesser extent Brahmanical, iconography.
King Icanavarman - who reigned from 616 to 637 - is a hero of the Chenla kingdom which would later become the Khmer Empire.
This epigraphic record is threadbare when compared with that south of the Dang Raek range, where in northern Cambodia, early state sites known collectively as Zhenia (Chenla) after Chinese accounts, dating between at least 550 CE until the foundation of Angkor in about 800 CE, are more plentiful.
43; also Vickery, 'Where and what was Chenla?', in Recherches nouvelles sur le Cambodge, ed.
(4) The pre-Angkorian Khmer of the Chenla era inhabited the present-day border region between Laos and Cambodia during about the fifth to eighth centuries.