Chephren


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Related to Chephren: Mycerinus

Chephren:

see KhafreKhafre
or Chephren
, fl. 2565 B.C., king of ancient Egypt, of the IV dynasty, and builder of the second pyramid at Giza. His face is perhaps that represented on the Great Sphinx. An obscure king, Dedefre, may have come between Khufu and Khafre in the dynasty.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Hans-Werner Fischer-Elfert behandelt in seinem Beitrag ein kleines Ostrakon, welches "Die Lehre des Amenemhet im Totentempel des Chephren" und hier den Beginn der neunten Strophe beinhaltet.
He also points to the work of John Anthony West who presented forensic evidence that the face on the Sphinx in no way showed the features of the Pharaoh Chephren, as Egyptologists have claimed.
The other two major pyramids in the complex were built for Pharaohs Chephren (Khafre) and Mycerinus (Menkaure).
There are three main pyramids at Giza - Cheops, Chephren and Mycerinus - all mausoleums to Pharaohs who lived and died as gods.
* In the 1960s, a muon detector was used to examine the Chephren Pyramid near Cairo, Egypt.
A coach took us to the nearby pyramid of Cheops's son Chephren. It still has some of the limestone casing at its peak, which originally would have fully covered the pyramids and allowed the sunlight to reflect off their mirror-like surfaces.
A coach took us to the nearby pyramid of Cheops' son, Chephren. It still has some of the limestone casing at its peak, which originally would have fully covered the pyramids and allowed the sunlight to reflect off their mirror-like surfaces.
The group will visit the famous Giza Pyramids, the Valley Temple of King Chephren, and the Great Sphinx.
Many Egyptologists believe it was carved on the instruction of the Fourth Dynasty Pharaoh Chephren -- who built the second pyramid on the Giza plain.
In the distance we could see the Mokattam Hills, where Cheops slaves had hewn the stones we now stood upon, close at hand the bulk of Chephren and Myercerinus.
Hawass says it was built by King Chephren and was part of a temple complex that stood in front of the pharaoh's imposing pyramid.
I will close with the example of the statue of the pharaoh I used at the end of another article.(40) If we think of Chephren as "form," as an "expression of the ancient Egyptian genius or imagination," then the stone out of which he is carved is of little interest except insofar as it shows us the expressive use the sculptor or sculptors have made of its cubic volume and hardness.