Chernenko


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Chernenko

Konstantin (Ustinovich) . 1911--85, Soviet statesman; general secretary of the Soviet Communist Party (1984--85)
References in periodicals archive ?
This television framing started with the absence of Premier Alexei Kosygin during the 1979 parade, and reached its peak between 1982 and 1984, during the fast-changing leadership between Brezhnev, Andropov and Chernenko.
For example, Chernenko and Sunderam (2015) show that bond funds hold greater amounts of combined cash and cash-equivalent assets compared to equity funds.
On 2 June 1982, in timing that could not have been accidental, Husak presented Konstantin Chernenko with Czechoslovakia's highest award.
Chernenko and Andropov were KGB heads, who succeeded Brezhnev one after the other.
El encuentro en el Kremlin con el premier ruso Konstantin Chernenko se caracterizo por la coincidencia de enfoques sobre las perspectivas bilaterales, si bien reconociendo la existencia de apreciaciones diferentes respectoa los diversos problemas del mundobipolar.
Le sigue Konstantin Chernenko, "ya grande, una especie de transicion, y muere tambien (10 de marzo de 1985).
Daria Chernenko, a specialist at Bonhams, comments: 'Most of our buyers are from the former Soviet Union and include private individuals, institutions, and dealers.
Contrarily, Chernenko and Faulkender (2011) found that non-financial firms used derivatives not only for hedging but also for speculation.
By the time he died 13 months later, Chernenko has probably spent more time being tended to by doctors than attending to affairs of state.
Chernenko, who was the Soviet Union's leader for 13 months, died at age 73; he was succeeded by Mikhail Gorbachev.
On one trip (to Finland), they learned that Gorbachev was likely to succeed Chernenko as Soviet General Secretary, and gained some inkling of the fresh ideas he might bring with him.
However, the cooperation of the church hierarchy notwithstanding, persecution of true believers returned with a new vengeance under the successive reigns of Khrushchev, Brezhnev, Chernenko, and Andropov.