Trail of Tears

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Trail of Tears

forced march of 18,000 Cherokees westward to Indian Territory (Oklahoma); 4,000 die of disease and exposure (winter, 1838–1839). [Am. Hist.: EB, 2: 808]
References in periodicals archive ?
Nellie the Brave: The Cherokee Trail of Tears (1838) (Sisters in Time #10)
The language is spare but gut-wrenching: "They are starting my dad / on the medicine trail / like the Cherokee Trail of Tears / where you stumble / and fall along the hard way." At the end of the story: "One star gleamed I and sparked / like Dad's eyes I it seemed he was there / loving me / his dust his bones his voice / part of a star."
Justice said some readers have drawn a parallel between the story told in Kynship and the Cherokee Trail of Tears, the forced relocation of Cherokee men women and children from Georgia to Oklahoma in the 1830s, a journey of a thousand miles that saw thousands die before reaching their destination.
people: IRN; Cherokee Trail of Tears: Ralph Jenkins, tngenweb.org,
Now when I grow Cherokee White Flour Corn, Coushaw Squash, and Cherokee Trail of Tears Bean (which I located from another seed saver) in the "Three Sisters" native guild section of our garden, I not only get beautiful plants and great food but I feel like I'm preserving a bit of cultural history as well as maintaining a link to my own families past.
More recent estimates put the number of deaths at nearly 8,000 people who died as a direct result of the Cherokee Trail of Tears. (134)
It is reflected in one passage as follows: "The Fur Queen laid her lips upon the cheek of caribou hunter Abraham Okimasis, grand champion of the world, the kiss frozen in time." The reader is allowed to perceive this within a loose frame of reference, but also with a montage of symbols ranging through Dizzy Gillespie, Sitting Bull, Tweedledum and Tweedledee, Buffalo Bill, John Wayne, Huckleberry Hound, the Cherokee Trail of Tears, Wounded Knee, Princess Pocahontas, the Body of Christ, Mother Earth, and Porky Pig, among others.
The fact that the majority of the Cherokee people were ultimately forced to relocate to present day Oklahoma via the Indian Removal Act of 1830 (4 Stat., 411) in what became known as the Cherokee Trail of Tears in which over 4,000 Cherokee died while in route to their new homeland is, of course, crushing proof that the federal government could and often did abrogate this richly-textured and multi-layered sense of tribal trust, and in the process violated its own trust understanding (Foreman, 1932).
Read about Cherokee Trail of Tears bean, grown by the Cherokee nation and transported with them when they were forcibly removed from their homeland; the Brandywine tomato, which tomato lovers claim is the best tasting tomato in the world, and the beautiful Moon and Stars watermelon, which was barely rescued from extinction by the Seeds Savers Exchange.