Chestnut soil

Chestnut soil

[′ches‚nət ¦sȯil]
(geology)
One of the major groups of zonal soils, developed typically in temperate to cool, subhumid to semiarid climate; the Chestnut soils in modern classification include Ustolls, Borolls, and Xerolls.
References in periodicals archive ?
Other authors [6, 8, 14-19] also states the increase of the amount of nitrates and ammonium in a layer of 0-30 cm of common and leached chernozem and chestnut soil in the course of regular fertilization in crop rotation.
Productivity of a stage of crop rotation depending on fertilizers on chestnut soils of the Republic of North Ossetia, Synopsis of a thesis of a Candidate of Agricultural Sciences, Vladikavkaz, pp: 18.
Thus, the humus content has decreased by 22-25% in the most fertile soil of the country (black soils), by 14% in chestnut soil, and by 30 % in the gray soil for the last 60 years, according to the Kazakh Research Institute of Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry named after U.
NATURAL AND ECONOMIC AREAS OF THE LAND OF KAZAKHSTAN, THOUSANDS OF HECTARES (ACCORDING TO THE AGENCY OF LAND RESOURCES OF REPUBLIC OF KAZAKHSTAN) No Natural area Type of soil Total For amount agrarian use 1 Forest-steppe Black soil 758.2 506.2 2 Steppe Black soil, 26448.0 23514.7 South black soil 3 Arid steppe Chestnut soil, Dark 62386.6 55539.6 chestnut soil 4 Semi-desert Light chestnut soil 37258.6 33851.6 5 Desert Brown soil, takyr 112152.3 83601.3 soil, sand 6 Foothill desert Grey-brownish soil, 33486.0 25571.3 and steppe, Dark chestnut desert, soil, Mountain mountain areas soils 7 Total 272490.2 222584.6
South of the herb-grassland steppe, the tipchak-feather grass steppe has chestnut soils that developed in a drier climate and are not as fertile as the chrenozems.
Soil types, ranging up the mountain, are: chestnut soils, grading into chernozems, mountain-forest, and mountain-meadow sub-alpine soils developed at altitudes above 2,200 m (7,200 ft) and finally alpine soils that developed above about 2,900 m (9,500 ft).
At the foot of the Altai Mountains, chestnut soils grade into chernozems with increased elevation, then gray forest soils, mountain-forest, mountain-podzolic, and mountain-meadow soils.
In studying the effect of cultivation on the microflora of dark chestnut soils in Akmola region, it was found that cultivation significantly increases the number of ammonifying bacteria.
When comparing the microflora of dark and light chestnut soils it was revealed a high content of microscopic fungi in the dark chestnut soils.
The relatively high level of mineralization processes in the dark chestnut soils leads to a decrease in the content of fungi of the genus Mucor fungi and yeast, whose development is related to the content of slightly decomposed organic substance in the soil.
The genus Fusarium is relatively rich both in the black soil and dark chestnut soils, is found in large numbers of the cultivated soils compared to the virgin ones (Jay Shankar Singh, Vimal Chandra Pandey, and Singh 2011).