Heber

(redirected from Chever)
Also found in: Dictionary.
Related to Chever: Chevrolet

Heber

(hē`bər), in the Bible. 1 Eponym of the Hebrews. It also appears as Eber. 2 Kenite, husband of Jael. 3, 4 Benjamites. 5 Gadite. 6 Judahite. 7 Asherite. 8 Eber, priest.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
References in periodicals archive ?
Zambish [Zeev Chever, friend of PM Sharon and chairman of Amana, which handles the logistics of the settlement enterprise - ed.],said.
The office's team of Civil Service and Foreign Service staff is led by Director Evan Bloom, who joined the office in 2006 after many years in the Legal Adviser's Office, and Deputy Director Chever Voltmer, a senior FSO with broad experience at overseas posts.
So, when Margo Chevers asked me to get involved with this event, I said most definitely ...
CAPTAIN Henry Chevers MacLean, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, who was killed in France, was the son of Henry MacLean, formerly of Newton-by-Chester, and grandson of the late Joseph Brooks.
A good number of these families, including the Bellews, Nugents, Geoghegans, Nettervilles, Chevers, Aylwards, Butlers and others, survived 'as substantial landowners' (p.
Lewis consults non-European and non-Christian materials as well, just as Orientalists were not always ignorant of "native" perspectives and were often highly schooled in them.) Andrea, instead of relying on a simplistic "Christian" versus "Muslim" scenario, or its opposite--an equally simplistic "all are multicultural and hybrid" argument--shows how Maltese indigenes were differently occluded and represented in English writings spanning more than a century; particularly fascinating is her account of two Quaker women, Katherine Evans and Sarah Chevers, whose "silencing" of the Maltese is further muted by their male editors.
The fascinating third chapter considers the perceptual ramifications of religious missions by Quakers Mary Fisher (in 1657, resulting in her speaking directly to Ottoman Sultan Mehmed IV), Katherine Evans and Sarah Chevers (both imprisoned in Malta from 1659-62 for their religious and political convictions).
Instead of fearing the beginning of the workweek, the students in Mary Chevers' clown class at Carteret Community College see Monday as the perfect time for a little clowning around.