chevron

(redirected from Chevrons)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

chevron

an ornamental moulding having a zigzag pattern
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Chevron

A symmetrical “V” shape that represents a triangle with its third side removed. It can be bordered and interlaced and is often repeated in various patterns that point up or down, with an angle between 60 and 75 degrees.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Chevron

 

a badge consisting primarily of angular stripes of galloon, braid, or cord and worn in many armies on various parts of the uniform—usually the sleeve—to indicate rank. Chevrons are also used to designate the number of years of extended service, the level of study of a cadet, and the receipt of a wound.

Gold gallooned chevrons to be worn on the left sleeve of the greatcoat and the pea jacket were introduced in the Soviet Navy in February 1941 to indicate extended service. Chevrons of silver or gold galloon, also indicating extended service, were introduced in the Soviet Army in November 1945. They were worn on the left sleeve of the greatcoat, dress jacket, and service shirt. After January 1958, chevrons were no longer used.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

chevron

[′shev·rən]
(vertebrate zoology)
The bone forming the hemal arch of a caudal vertebra.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

chevron

chevron, 2
1. A V-shaped stripe pointing up or down, used singly or in groups in heraldry and on uniforms; hence, any ornament so shaped.
2. A molding showing a zigzag sequence of these ornaments in Romanesque architecture or derivatives; a dancette or zigzag molding.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
(50.) See, e.g., (Pierce), supra note 2, [section] 3.4 (discussing benefits of Chevrons reconceptualization of judicial review); KEITH WERHAN, PRINCIPLES OF ADMINISTRATIVE LAW 372 (2d ed.
This Article presents findings from the most comprehensive empirical study to date on how the federal courts of appeals have applied Chevron deference--the doctrine under which courts defer to a federal agency's reasonable interpretation of an ambiguous statute that it administers.
This paper reports on tests that investigated the drivers' visual and motor feedback to colored Chevrons. This study quantitatively identified the effect of the Chevrons and, then, optimized the setting of Chevrons in order to decrease the occurrence of crashes in snow and ice environment.
The Chevrons are commonly applied to guide the driving direction and to indicate changes in road alignment.
Chevron's first-quarter revenue came in at $23.5 billion, compared with $34.5 billion a year ago.