chi-square test

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chi-square test:

see statisticsstatistics,
science of collecting and classifying a group of facts according to their relative number and determining certain values that represent characteristics of the group.
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chi-square test

[′kī ¦skwer ′test]
(statistics)
A generalization, and an extension, of a test for significant differences between a binomial population and a multinomial population, wherein each observation may fall into one of several classes and furnishes a comparison among several samples instead of just two.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The chi-squared test applied to the overall figures revealed a value of 33.500, which is higher than the critical one.
From the P - values in Chi-squared test, it can be interpreted that the factors associated with the occurrence of gastrointestinal haemorrhage are total leucocyte count more than 10,000/[mm.sup.3], PT-INR more than 1.5, amount of bilirubin more than 10 mg/dL and alkaline phosphatase level more than 150 IU.
Percentage of chewing sensitivity in extraction and non-extraction groups ((a): The Fisher's Exact chi-squared test, (b): Yates-corrected chi-squared test).
The chi-squared test employed by Boncek and Harden is usually encountered when dealing with a multinomial random variable.
A fundamental assumption of the chi-squared test is that the cases one is studying are independent of one another.
Fall 2000 and fall 2001 road surveys were compared using a chi-squared test and found to have the same distribution (p>0.99).
A chi-squared test for independence was used to compare the percent of yellow, green, and brown leaves for the broccoli and lettuce seedlings for each extract.
The author has organized the main body of her text in nine chapters devoted to sampling strategies to eliminate confounding, sample size calculations, chi-squared tests, robust statistics, continuous distributions, tests for normality, and a wide variety of other related subjects.
Topics include Pearson's Sum and Pearson-Fisher test, modifications based on UMVUEs, vector-valued tests, probability distributions of interest, and chi-squared tests for specific distributions.
Chi-squared tests will be performed to determine if the observed number of plants with a particular phenotype equals the expected for independent assortment indicating whether or not the gps loci is linked to that particular trait.