Chiasmos

Chiasmos

 

in representational art, the depiction of a standing human figure in which the weight of the body is shifted onto one, supporting, leg; the hip that is thereby raised counterpoises the lowered shoulder, and the raised shoulder counterpoises the other, lowered, hip. Known to classical sculptors, chiasmos was rediscovered by Italian masters of the early Renaissance.

References in periodicals archive ?
Estrutural e anatomicamente solida, em chiasmos, e uma obra que obedeceu ao metodo classico na sua realizacao ja que podemos percepcionar o corpo humano que se encontra dentro das roupas.
That is to say, the narrative structure of the episode takes the form of a chiasmus, a rhetorical and structural device that is pervasive in sacred texts (15) (derived from chiasmos: "crossing" and chiazein: "to mark with the letter Chi [X]")--insofar as the stories of Krzysztof and Irena are inversely parallel to each other: if it can be argued that Krzysztof has embarked on a difficult journey from doubt to faith, Irena takes a correspondingly difficult journey from a secure, even complacent faith towards a nullifying doubt.
Like its twin sister chiasmos, antimetabole can be used to suggest ironic reversal; it challenges and, therefore, compels us to reconsider causal relationships:
The exemplifications in other rhetorical catalogues demonstrate that Carlin is only one of the latest in a long line of linguistic wits who employed antimetabole and chiasmos, including Moliere, Johnson, Dryden, Pope, Bierce, and Macaulay.
CHIASMOS (sometimes spelled "chiasmus"): reversing the arrangement of subject and complement in successive clauses (AB:BA):
While some rhetors make no distinction between antimetabole and chiasmos, I would insist on differentiating: in antimetabole the exact same two words are reversed in order:
In chiasmos the words reversed are not entirely the same and up to four different words or phrases can be used:
In chiasmos it is not the words so much as the order of the parts of speech that reverse--above: noun, adjective; adjective, (pro)noun.
Quinn provides another distinction between antimetabole and chiasmos, suggesting that larger groups of words can constitute chiasmos: not just sentences, but entire paragraphs, even entire books, can be arranged with the first half reversed in the second half, as if each half is a mirror image of the other (95).
Many of these precepts have become cliches by now, they are so widely known and quoted: "God helps them that help themselves"; "There are no Gains, without Pains"; "he that goes a borrowing goes a sorrowing." Here is one of my favorites employing chiasmos: "[If you] Keep thy Shop.