Chickahominy

Chickahominy

(chĭkəhŏm`ĭnē), river, c.90 mi (140 km) long, rising NW of Richmond, Va., and flowing SE to the James River. In the Civil War fighting was heavy along its banks.
References in classic literature ?
At the battle of Gaines's Mill, one of the fiercest conflicts of the Civil War, with a hundred guns in play, spectators a mile and a half away on the opposite side of the Chickahominy valley heard nothing of what they clearly saw.
As new federally recognized tribes, the Chickahominy, the Chickahominy - Eastern Division, the Upper Mattaponi, the Rappahannock, the Monacan, and the Nansemond, have a right to understand all the benefits and resources that are available to them under this designation, wrote the members in a letter to U.
These sorts of considerations make the Hanson and Chickahominy quarries highly probable sources for the Titanic headstone material.
Stuart's Finest Hour: The Ride Around McClellan June 1862 is an in-depth study about Brigadier General Jeb Stuart's Great Chickahominy Raid, during the American Civil War.
Abbott spent his early years in Chickahominy, a working-class, heavily Italian-American neighborhood in Greenwich, Conn.
Syphard AD, Garcia MW (2001) Human and beaver induced wetland changes in the Chickahominy River watershed from 1953 to 1994.
39) See the 1614 Treaty with Chickahominy in Ralph Hamor, A True Discourse of the Present State of Virginia (London, 1615), 13-14.
Waller also planted daughter congregations for these former daughters of his church: Dover, Licking Hole (Smyrna); and Chickahominy (Winn's Church) in Hanover County and Exol Church in King and Queen County.
Instead, if he wished to utilize Chickahominy warriors, he was forced to hire them and pay for their services with copper.
McClellan complied with his superior's wishes, though in doing so he was compelled to put his army in an exceedingly problematic position astride the Chickahominy River with his right flank and rear vulnerable to a Confederate turning movement until McDowell arrived.
Adkins and Robert Green, the chiefs of the Chickahominy and Patawomeck tribes, appear in the documentary, describing their initial wariness of yet another project reinventing their old world anew and cautiously expressing "high hopes" for the film's potential to evoke among its viewers the long overdue recognition of the people who greeted the settlers of Jamestown.