Childe Harold

Childe Harold

makes pilgrimage throughout Europe for liberty and personal revelation. [Br. Lit.: “Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage” in Magill IV, 127–129]
See: Journey
References in classic literature ?
These are a few verses from one of the best known parts of Childe Harold.
Like his own Childe Harold, "With pleasure drugg'd he almost long'd for woe.
Childe Harold not unfrequently perches himself upon the mast-head of some luckless disappointed whale-ship, and in moody phrase ejaculates: -- Roll on, thou deep and dark blue ocean, roll
Byron frames the third canto of Childe Harold with autobiography, through an address to his daughter (stanzas 1-2, 115-18).
Ehrenbreitstein, or The Bright Stone of Honour and the Tomb of Marceau, from Byron's Childe Harold, represents the stone obelisk near Koblenz that forms the monument to the young French revolutionary hero, General Francois-Severin Marceau-Desgraviers, whose bravery in battle prompted a delegation from the opposing Austrian forces to join with the French in honouring him.
He wrote his most famous work, Childe Harold of Dysna (1933), in Minsk about a Jew in Weimar Berlin.
En su poema narrativo Las peregrinaciones de Childe Harold (1812-1818), George Gordon (Lord Byron) hizo una critica acerba contra Thomas Bruce (Lord Elgin) por la sustraccion de las metopas y los frisos del Partenon, en tanto que John Keats, en su soneto Al ver los marmoles Elgin, expreso su fascinacion por ellos.
20, 1809), Cam Hobhouse reports that pederasty was openly practiced among the Albanians, and Lord Byron includes in his Childe Harold an Albanian song with pederastic themes, suppressed at publication.
But the order in which Childe Harold and Pride and Prejudice were composed does not correspond with their March 1812--January 1813 order of publication.
While Byron collaborated on or wrote in their entirety several texts on biblical and/or historical themes that would have readily attracted the notice of Jewish intellectuals and literati--most notably, Hebrew Melodies (1815), Cain (1821), and Heaven and Earth (1821)--translators did not limit themselves to these three texts, but also translated Canto 1 of Childe Harold (1812), The Prisoner of Chilton (1816), Mazeppa (1816), Darkness (1816), and Manfred (1817).
While Byron rouses the ethical posturing of the average English reader in this scene, in his notes to Childe Harold he condemns the hypocrisy of the westerner so anxious to condemn the Oriental while overlooking his own unflattering state of affairs at home:
Hebrew-Melodies is the poem most frequently translated or allegorized, but the other poems repeatedly taken up have been Childe Harold (Canto I, 1812), The Prisoner of Chillon (1816), Darkness (1816), Manfred (1817), Mazeppa (1819), Cain (1821), and Heaven and Earth (1821).