Childe Harold

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Childe Harold

makes pilgrimage throughout Europe for liberty and personal revelation. [Br. Lit.: “Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage” in Magill IV, 127–129]
See: Journey
References in classic literature ?
The first literary result of his journey was the publication in 1812 of the first two cantos of 'Childe Harold's Pilgrimage.' This began as the record of the wanderings of Childe Harold, a dissipated young noble who was clearly intended to represent the author himself; but Byron soon dropped this figure as a useless impediment in the series of descriptions of Spain and Greece of which the first two cantos consist.
And thus the heart will break, yet brokenly live on,' Lord Byron advised in 'Childe Harold's Pilgrimage.' In those immortal lines, we find a universal echo in our hearts' ghostly memory.
It is hard to understand how such juvenile writing could have been considered poetry by his contemporaries in whose minds the glorious odes of John Keats and Percy Bysshe Shelley and, especially, Byron's Childe Harold's Pilgrimage and Don Juan must still have been present as the high poetical standard of the time.
The work that first brought him recognition and renown was a lengthy poem titled "Childe Harold's Pilgrimage," published in four sections called cantos.
Their topics include Rousseau and British Romantic women writers, locating a refuge for the libertarian man of feeling in Julie, or the New Heloise and Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Rousseau and the writing of mountain experience in British literature of the Romantic period, Rousseau and Romanticism in Wales, reading Rousseau in the anti-Jacobin novel, Rousseauvian drama and Roman space in Shelley's The Cenci, and Rousseau and the Romantic essayists.
If this literary flowering weren't enough (Byron also wrote part of Childe Harold's Pilgrimage during his stay), the villa also appeared in Balzac's 1836 novel Albert Savants and the painter Balthus lived there briefly in 1945
She first saw Lord Byron, suddenly famous as the 24-year-old author of the long poem Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, at a party given by her cousins William and Caroline Lamb.
Childe Harold's Pilgrimage is an unabridged audiobook rendition of the classic poetic narrative that distinguished English author Lord Byron (1788-1824) as a literary genius of his time.
The "Harold" in the title refers to Lord Byron's poem "Childe Harold's Pilgrimage," describing the visit of a young man to Rome.
But it was not quite as popular as Scott had hoped it would be and it was eclipsed by Lord Byron's recent poem, Childe Harold's Pilgrimage.
But even though Childe Harold's Pilgrimage and Pride and Prejudice were not begun as close together in time as their publication dates would suggest, and even though Jane Austen had imagined and depicted Darcy long before Byron articulated Harold, the two works, their characters, and their sensibilities derive from the same era: the politically conservative, post-Revolutionary, pre-Waterloo period that might justly even in England be termed the Age of Napoleon.
Writings such as Byron's Childe Harold's Pilgrimage (1812), George Borrow's The Bible in Spain (1843), or Richard Ford's Handbook for Travellers in Spain (1845), share a similar image of Spain: a land full of exoticism and adventures where time seemed to have been stopped.