child

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Related to Children's: Children's theater, Children's stories

child

[chīld]
(computer science)
An element that follows a given element in a data structure.
In object-oriented programming, a subclass.

child

child

(1) In database management, the data that is dependent on its parent. See parent-child.

(2) A component that is subordinate to a higher-level component. See child menu, child program and child window.

Child

(dreams)
Some people have reoccurring dreams about a small child, while others, from time to time, dream about unfamiliar children. The child in your dream could represent your inner self, or the child within. The dream could be based on childhood memories, and it may carry a specific message or bring up long-buried issues. On the other hand, the dream could simply be a pleasant memory. Children in dreams could symbolize a need and an eagerness to learn, simplicity, intuition, new endeavors, and many other positive attributes of childhood. Occasionally, the child in your dreams may be pointing to your own childish ways. Therefore, consider all of the details and the tone of the dream before making an interpretation.
References in periodicals archive ?
As it is true for all higher mental functions, children's self-regulatory abilities originate in social interactions and only later become internalized and independently used by children (Vygotsky, 1978).
Parents of students with disabilities share the concerns of all parents about child-rearing and about education and also have additional concerns related to their children's disabilities.
In a recent study that looked at the affects of childhood poverty on the life chances of children, results revealed that correlations were the highest between family income and children's ability and achievement.
Library programs for very young children (birth through two years) and their adult caregivers are common public library initiatives designed both to introduce caregivers to library resources for young children and to provide two conditions thought to enhance children's emergent literacy: a print-filled environment and "a caring adult to introduce the child to literary pleasure" (Greene, 1991, p.
Dr Reznik is assistant professor of pediatrics at the Children's Hospital at Montefiore, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York.
Rehabilitation counselors who work with families can help prevent or lessen the opportunities for sexual abuse of children with disabilities through encouraging parents to increase their children's awareness and coping skills regarding abuse.
But despite this common scientific foundation, developments in children's environmental health (CEH) on the two sides of the Atlantic have been quite different.
In 1965, Nancy Larrick's groundbreaking article "The All-White World of Children's Books" was published in the Saturday Review of Books.
Few children's issues have drawn more attention, or been more controversial, than those involving their mental health.
Other topics include prescriptive ideas about children's upbringing, and discussions of laws relating to children.
Basing its report on 1994/95 and 2000/01 data collected by the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth on children aged six months to five years, the agency found the use of child care increased for all children within the age group regardless of the children's background, including children aged one to five years of age, children of single or two-parent families, children from lower or higher income households, and children living in rural or urban communities.
It uses Kinseyan techniques regarding children's "well-being" to undermine marriage, religion, and parental authority, and downplay the seriousness of child abuse.

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