Chileans


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Chileans

 

a nation and the main population of Chile, numbering about 10 million (1975 estimate). The Chileans evolved through the intermingling of Spanish conquerors with local Indian tribes, notably the Araucanians and Diaguitas. They speak Spanish and profess Catholicism,

References in periodicals archive ?
Alejandro Navarro, a Chilean parliamentarian and member of a group of Chilean politicians dubbed the "Green Bench," says that the government of President Eduardo Frei's handling of the issue was "erratic and contradictory." Elected officials criticized the Pumalin project, he says, but went out of their way to support large-scale foreign logging projects, such as the U.S.-based Trillium company's plans for Tierra del Fuego.
This study locates the construction of working-class masculinity in the Chilean copper mines in the tensions and antagonisms produced by the transformation of a population of itinerant laborers into a semi-skilled industrial working class.
Goodman and Ferrara, among others, have cited some problems with the Chilean approach - most notably the rather strict government regulations on how people can invest their retirement savings.
Turrentine said that Yugoslavian bulk wines are a little less expensive than Chilean, but that quality wasn't as good.
Compared with residents in some other Latin American countries with successful economies, Chileans, along with Colombians (44%) and Brazilians (41%), were the most likely to say they are very worried about not having enough money for retirement.
While more tourists are fine, visitors really don't figure into Chilean vineyards' business models, say some industry leaders.
Since the summer, a half- dozen former generals and two score other military officers have been indicted by reinvigorated Chilean courts.
He and other embassy officers talked about human rights with the Chileans. But they also made it clear to Chile that the problem was with Congress and the U.S.
Summary: The 33 trapped Chilean miners have been given a bundle of fibre-optic joy allowing them to watch the Chilean national football team play.
Standing halfway up the steep walkway at Camp Sewell, the tiny mining town known as the birthplace of the Chilean copper industry, it's easy to see why, early on, people never came down.