Chinaman

(redirected from Chinamen)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms.
?Note: This page may contain content that is offensive or inappropriate for some readers.

Chinaman

1. Archaic or derogatory a native or inhabitant of China
2. Cricket a ball bowled by a left-handed bowler to a right-handed batsman that spins from off to leg
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in classic literature ?
"And I, for another, don't care to give in to a handful of dirty Chinamen to escape drowning," I answered hotly.
We got up and went out on the verandah, leaving the supine stranger to be dealt with by the Chinamen. The last thing I saw they had put a plate with a slice of pine-apple on it before him and stood back to watch what would happen.
The fore-deck, packed with Chinamen, was full of sombre clothing, yellow faces, and pigtails, sprinkled over with a good many naked shoulders, for there was no wind, and the heat was close.
The "boy" might have been forty or a hundred and forty for all you could tell- one of those Chinamen of the death's-head type of face and completely inscrutable.
A large part of the Calcutta purchase was sold to a firm having control of certain small coastwise steamers of small draft which plied from port to port and peddled out cargoes of the poor rice through Chinamen. The contract of sale forbade, under bond penalty, disposition of the rice at a price greater than $6.50 Mexican per picul of 137 pounds, plus actual cost of freight.
And deponent further says that Norman Assing, Leikid, and Chidock, three Chinamen, have conspired together to abduct the above named Atoy, against her will, out of this country, and carry her forcibly to China.
We fought the Chinamen and their exclusion took place." (57)
Shamsi's chinamen proved something of a mystery as he took two for 20 in four overs, which included having Collingwood caught low down at extra cover, giving Cobb his third catch.
Foran found that picketers encouraged patrons to eat elsewhere "on the ground that they are Chinamen and members of the yellow race, and that Americans should not patronize a Chinese restaurant, but should confine their patronage and support to restaurants operated by Americans or by white persons."
The author didn't let her black characters off the hook either: They toss off some derogatory remarks about "Chinamen," Jews, and fellow African Americans.
In keeping with other Pacific Rim Gold Mountain sites (Australia, the USA and Canada), the Chinese in New Zealand have typically been characterised as economic scapegoats, alien invaders and "ching chong chinamen" (or objects of ridicule), and such characterisations have served to justify our marginalisation and exclusion.