Nampo

(redirected from Chinnampo)

Nampo

Nampo (nämˈpô), formerly Chinnampo (chĭn-nämˈpô), city (1993 pop. 731,448), W North Korea, on Korea Bay (or West Korea Bay). It is the port city for Pyongyang and is also a leading metallurgical center. Other industries include shipbuilding, glassmaking, and electrode manufacturing.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Nampo

 

(Chinnampo), a city in the northwestern People’s Democratic Republic of Korea, in Pyongan-namdo Province. Population, more than 100,000 (1965). Railroad station. Situated at the mouth of the Taedong-gang, Nampo serves as the outer harbor for Pyongyang on the Yellow Sea. The city is a center for nonferrous metallurgy; zinc and copper are among the metals smelted. Among Nampo’s other industries are machine building (including shipyards), glass, silk weaving, flour milling, and fishing.


Nampo

 

a group of three mountainous archipelagoes (the Izu, Bonin, and Volcano islands) that extends for about 2,200 km and separates the Philippine Sea from the northwestern Pacific Ocean. In the east they border on the Izu-Bonin and Volcano deep-sea troughs. The islands belong to Japan. The maximum elevation is 969 m (Minami-Iwo Jima Volcano in the Volcano Islands). The islands have been formed by volcanic and partially coral superstructures on an underwater ridge linking the Japanese and Mariana mountain-island arcs. There are many active volcanoes.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Navy also redeployed United Nations (UN) forces from Chinnampo and Inchon on the west coast.
Militarily usable ports, shown on map 1, then comprised, on the west coast, Chinnampo, Inchon, and Kunsan, dominated by the great tidal range of the shallow Yellow Sea; on the east were Songjin, Hungnam, Wonsan, and Pusan, with deep water just offshore.
On 24 November, having opened Chinnampo for naval logistic support, and supported by Fifth Air Force, Eighth Army units attacked north from the Chongchon River--II Corps on the left, IX Corps in the middle, and the ROK II Corps on the right--with orders to link up with X Corps.
Facing the prospect of simultaneous retrograde movements by Eighth Army on the west coast and by X Corps on the east, Doyle retained overall command of the redeployments but directed Amphibious Group 3, under Rear Admiral Lyman Thackrey, to attend to Eighth Army at Chinnampo and Inchon, leaving Amphibious Group 1, under his direct command, to support X Corps at Songjin, Wonsan, and Hungnam.
When an isolated North Korean observation post was spotted on Sogon-ni Point, near the North Korean port of Chinnampo, he decided to send his men ashore and seize some prisoners.
The other possible ports had too many strategic disadvantages: Chinnampo, near Pyongyang, was too far north; Posung-Myon presented difficult terrain in its hinterland; and Kunsan was simply too close to Pusan to make it worthwhile.
A British naval task force carried out a bombardment of Chinnampo, and a British frigate landed a raiding party at Kunsan.
On 13 August, crews sank three boats and two barges engaged in minelaying near Chinnampo, and damaged two surface craft near Wonsan.
Moore Mig Alley 16 May 53 Pilot Unk Mig Alley 17 May 53 Lt Dorris Chinnampo, NK 17 May 53 Pilot Unk Unk 27 May 53 Lt Douglas G.
This meant that Thackrey conducted operations at Chinnampo and Inchon largely independently, while Doyle commanded efforts at Songjin, Wonsan, and Hungnam.
Brock's Task Element, the strongest naval force off" the west coast of Korea with six destroyers--three Canadian, two Australian, and an American--was ordered to evacuate Chinnampo, the port of Pyongyang, when the Chinese sent UN forces reeling southward in December.