Chippewa

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Chippewa

(chĭp`əwô', –wä'), river, c.200 mi (320 km) long, rising in several forks in the lake region of N Wis. and flowing SW to the Mississippi, which it enters at the foot of Lake Pepin. Eau Claire and Chippewa Falls are on its banks. The river was once important in the lumbering industry.

Chippewa:

see OjibwaOjibwa
or Chippewa
, group of Native North Americans whose language belongs to the Algonquian branch of the Algonquian-Wakashan linguistic stock (see Native American languages).
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References in periodicals archive ?
The win snapped a four-game losing streak to the Chippewas (0-3, 0-1).
Chippewas of the Thames First Nation v Enbridge Pipelines Inc., 2017 SCC 41 (CanLII)
"The case has huge implications for First Nations across the country," said Chippewas of the Thames First Nation Chief Leslee White-Eye.
"It was different [from a repatriation for culturally affiliated ancestors] in many ways, including the number of people from all walks of life and those representing federally recognized Indian tribes in the state of Michigan," said William Johnson, curator at the Ziibiwing Center of Anishinabe Culture and Lifeways, which has represented the Saginaw Chippewas in NAGPRA matters since 1994.
In 1906 the Chippewas of the Thames hired a lawyer by the name of A.J.
By that treaty we lost some 500,000 acres in the Bruce Peninsula, but reserved land, including lands still home to the Chippewas of Saugeen and the Chippewas of Nawash Unceded First Nation.
The first part of the book relies primarily on archival records and print publications to document Protestant missionaries' introduction of Christian hymns to Minnesota Ojibwes (also Chippewas or Anishinaabeg) in the late-nineteenth century.
Love Medicine comprises fourteen linked stories, which are narrated in Faulknerian style by seven members of three generations of the Lamartine and Kashpaw families of the Turtle Mountain Chippewas. In The Beet Queen, set between 1930 and 1970, Karl and Mary Ardare are abandoned when their mother Mary flies away with a carnival barnstormer.
The Chippewas of the Thames First Nation has filed a request to the Federal Court of Appeal seeking leave to appeal the National Energy Board's approval of Enbridge's Line 9 pipeline project.
By that treaty we lost some 500,000 acres in the Bruce Peninsula but reserved land, including lands still home to the Chippewas of Saugeen and the Chippewas of Nawash Unceded First Nation.