Chivalric Romance


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Chivalric Romance

 

an epic genre of courtly literature that poeticized knighthood in the figures of such heroes as King Arthur, Lancelot, Tristan, and Amadís. The chivalric romance poeticized the exploits of knights, performed in the name of glory, love, and moral perfection. The genre’s authors included Chrétien de Troyes, Hartmann von Aue, Wolfram von Eschenbach, and Thomas Malory (England).

References in periodicals archive ?
The section on 'Chiv-alric romance' chooses to leave out the monumental Iberian chivalric romance cycles of Amadis and Palmerin, despite their focus on the Eastern Mediterranean, and the enormous cultural influence they wielded.
Literacy rates, in Spain and elsewhere, rose in correlation to increased access to texts, and women were particularly likely to acquire books in fictional genres like chivalric romance (Rivers 38; Rothstein 15-17).
Van Kramer says, "Running at full speed this book cements a must-read space opera that captures the reader in thrilling locations, classic adventure, chivalric romance and exciting action.
'Chivalric biographies were a flourishing genre', the translators and editors note in their introduction, which 'often echoed chivalric romance' (p.
Certainly Austen was a discerning reader of authors such as Scott, Gilpin, and Samuel Johnson, who, according to Eithne Henson, "was addicted to chivalric romance" (19).
The city also boasts a rich historical and cultural legacy linked to the Duchy of Borja (and its fourth duke, San Francisco de Borja), classic Catalan writers the likes of Ausis March or Joanot Martorell, author of the chivalric romance Tirant lo Blanc, as well as an interesting natural heritage featuring 7.5 km of coastline.
The condemnation of Marcela as guilty of the death of the scholar turned "shepherd" depends upon literalizing the tropes of pastoral poetry and Petrarchanism--even as Alonso Quijano in the guise of Don Quixote has attempted a literal realization of the conventions of the chivalric romance. Hence readers, as well as the other characters, are brought up short by the Don's stern defense of the lady's right to reject an unwanted suitor.
In this book, author Dani Cavallaro presents readers with an examination of chivalric romance, arguing that it is characterized by its lack of center, structurally, the self-consciousness of the narrative, and its use of irony.
The protagonists of all these tropical adventure romances, unlike the heroes of chivalric romance or quest literature in general, nearly invariably fail in their original quest.
This genre romance, which does not include Troilus and Cressida, lacks an agreed-upon conceptual definition and bears but a modest resemblance to the traditional genre romance, chivalric romance.
The result is a close retelling of the romanzo cavalleresco, the chivalric romance. Syrovy opens with a clear retelling of Sorel's less popular novel, examining the resulting genre itself rather than individual themes, exposing the novel's quest to serve as an archetype of the genre.