Houbara Bustard

(redirected from Chlamydotis undulata)

Houbara Bustard

 

(Otis undulata), a bird in the family Otididae of the order Gruiformes. Body length, 65-80 cm. The feathers are sandy gray with dark specks; it has a crest on the head and a collar of white and black feathers on the neck.

The Houbara bustard is found in the deserts and semi-deserts of North Africa and Asia (east to western Mongolia). In the USSR it is distributed from Transcaucasia to Tuva. The Houbara bustard is cautious, runs well, and flies well, although usually close to the ground. Most Houbara bustards are migratory. They nest in individual pairs. Two or three eggs are laid in a hole in the ground. Only the female broods and takes care of the young. They feed on plant bulbs and shoots, insects, and reptiles. They do not drink, as the moisture contained in their food is sufficient. The Houbara bustard was formerly hunted, but recently its numbers decreased drastically and hunting is now prohibited.

References in periodicals archive ?
(2-5) These deformities, particularly rotational deformities of the long bones, affect various avian species, including ostriches (Struthio camelus), chickens, turkeys, guinea fowl, psittacine birds, ratites, cranes, waterfowl, and bustards (Chlamydotis undulata).
In another bird, the North African houbara (Chlamydotis undulata [Jacquin, 1784|), artificially inseminated females visually stimulated by highly displaying males had higher hatching success, and allocated more androgens to their eggs leading to increased growth rates in chicks (Loyau and Lacroix 2010).
Known in zoology as Chlamydotis undulata macqueeni, the Houbara bustard is a threatened species and is at a high risk of extinction, according to IUCN's Red List.
Abu Dhabi -- Sir Bani Yas, the award-winning nature and wildlife island reserve located in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi's western region, has welcomed 20 Houbara Bustards (Chlamydotis undulata macqueenii) to its thrilling wildlife population.
That's the courtship display North African birds called houbara bustards (Chlamydotis undulata) perform repeatedly.
On biology of houbara bustard (Chlamydotis undulata macqueenii) in Balochistan Pakistan: food of some dominant bird species and food web.
His Majesty had ordered the launch of the project in a bid to provide breeding habitats for houbara bustard (chlamydotis undulata) birds and protect them from overhunting and poaching.
He also valued highly the achievements of the UAE-based International Fund for Houbara Conservation, which offered Bahrain a number of Asian Houbara (Chlamydotis undulata) birds, also known as MacQueen's Houbara, in a bid to provide them with sustainable breeding space.
Houbara bustard (Chlamydotis undulata) is included among "IUCN red list of threatened species (http://www.iucnredlist.org/)" largely due to over hunting and habitat loss to grazing.
These include Critically Endangered: caracal (Felis caracal) and white- backed vulture (Gypus bengalensis); Endangered: Indian wolf (Canis lupus pallipes); Vulnerbale: hog deer (Axis porcinus), marbled teal (Marmaronetta angustirostris), Pallas's fish eagle (Haliaeetus leucoryphus), imperial eagle (Aquila heliacal), saker falcon (Falco cherrug), houbara bustard (Chlamydotis undulata), Sindh babbler (Chrysomma altirostre) and Indian marsh crocodile (Crocodylus palustris) (Table 2).
They are: Hawksbill Turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata), Dugong (Dugong dugon), Greater Flamingo (Phoenicopterus roseus), Caracal (Caracal caracal), Arabian Oryx (Oryx leucoryx), Houbara Bustard (Chlamydotis undulata), Mountain Gazelle (Gazella gazelle cora), Saker Falcon (Falco cherrug), Pharaoh Eagle-owl (Bubo ascalaphus), Sand Cat (Felis margarita), Arabian Sand Gecko (Stenodactylus arabicus) and the Blanford's Fox (Vulpes cana).