Chloe


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Chloe

(klō`ē), in the New Testament, Corinthian woman in whose house there were Christians.

Chloë

beautiful shepherdess beloved by Daphnis. [Rom. Lit.: “Daphne and Chloë” in Brewer Handbook, 204]

Chloë

“fearful virgin” learns love’s delights on wedding night. [Gk. Lit.: Daphnis and Chloe, Magill I, 184]

Chloë

beloved maiden, goddess of new, green crops. [Gk. Myth.: Parrinder, 62]

Chloë

Arcadian goddess, patronness of new, green crops. [Gk. Myth.: Parrinder, 62]
References in classic literature ?
But, Aunt Chloe, I'm getting mighty hungry," said George.
Mose done, Mas'r George," said Aunt Chloe, lifting the lid and peeping in,--"browning beautiful--a real lovely brown.
And with this final expression of contempt for Sally's greenness, Aunt Chloe whipped the cover off the bake-kettle, and disclosed to view a neatly-baked pound-cake, of which no city confectioner need to have been ashamed.
They wanted me to come to supper in the house," said George; "but I knew what was what too well for that, Aunt Chloe.
So you did--so you did, honey," said Aunt Chloe, heaping the smoking batter-cakes on his plate; "you know'd your old aunty'd keep the best for you.
said Aunt Chloe, with earnestness, catching his arm, "you wouldn't be for cuttin' it wid dat ar great heavy knife
said Aunt Chloe, contemptuously; "I mean, set along side our folks.
and Aunt Chloe tossed her head as one who hoped she did know something of the world.
Here Aunt Chloe sighed, and rolled up her eyes with emotion.
I'm sure, Aunt Chloe, I understand I my pie and pudding privileges," said George.
Aunt Chloe sat back in her chair, and indulged in a hearty guffaw of laughter, at this witticism of young Mas'r's, laughing till the tears rolled down her black, shining cheeks, and varying the exercise with playfully slapping and poking Mas'r Georgey, and telling him to go way, and that he was a case--that he was fit to kill her, and that he sartin would kill her, one of these days; and, between each of these sanguinary predictions, going off into a laugh, each longer and stronger than the other, till George really began to think that he was a very dangerously witty fellow, and that it became him to be careful how he talked "as funny as he could.
Pity, now, Tom couldn't," said Aunt Chloe, on whose benevolent heart the idea of Tom's benighted condition seemed to make a strong impression.