Chlorobium


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Chlorobium

[klȯr′ō·bē·əm]
(microbiology)
A genus of bacteria in the family Chlorobiaceae; cells are ovoid, rod- or vibrio-shaped, and nonmotile, do not have gas vacuoles, contain bacteriochlorophyll c or d, and are free-living.
References in periodicals archive ?
The bacteria involved include Azotobacter, Clostridium, Chromatium and Chlorobium (Burris 2002).
Biswas, "Hydrogen sulphide conversion to elemental sulphur in a suspended-growth continuous stirred tank reactor using Chlorobium limicola," Water Research, vol.
Beale, "Glutamyl-tRNA reductase of Chlorobium vibrioforme is a dissociable homodimer that contains one tightly bound heme per subunit," Journal of Bacteriology, vol.
number Source organism 1 Sphingobacterium spiritivorum 2 Desulfuromonas acetoxidans 3 Capnocytophaga canimorsus 4 Chlorobium phaeobacteroides 5 Prosthecochloris aestuarii 6 Myroides odoratus 7 Riemerella anatipestifer 8 Flavobacteria bacterium 9 Chlorobium limicola 10 Zobellia galactanivorans 11 Chryseobacterium gleum 12 Cellulophaga lytica 13 Mesoflavibacter zeaxanthinifaciens 14 Zunongwangia profunda 15 Cyanothece sp.
The second column represents a lake of the Archaean Eon (3500 million years ago) and holds an anaerobic community predominated by purple sulfur phototrophic bacteria (Chromatium sp., Thiocapsa sp.) and green sulfur bacteria (Chlorobium sp.).
In our previous work, we had data-mined genomic databases and utilized available biochemical data on metabolic pathways of several reductive chemoautotrophic organisms that included Aquifex aeolicus, Hydrogenobacter ther-mophilus, Thiomicrospira denitrificans, and Chlorobium terpidium, enabling us to construct an almost complete chart of reductive autotrophic intermediary metabolism (Sriniva-san and Morowitz, 2009).
Below Microcoleus are the red and green sulphur bacteria, including salmon-colored colonies of Thiocapsa, pink swimming Chromatium, and the strictly anaerobic green Chlorobium.
In the "Contents" of that document, the following taxa are referred to: mice, microorganisms, bacteria, Pseudomonadaceae, Enterobacteriacea, Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum, Proprionibacterium shermanii, E.
The nature of this early life was unclear until studies beginning in 1966 on the bacterium Chlorobium limicola forma thiosulphatophilum led to the discovery of a metabolic network that has come to be known as the reductive citric acid (rTCA) cycle (Evans et al., 1966).