Chomsky

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Related to Chomskyan: Noam Chomsky

Chomsky

(Avram) Noam . born 1928, US linguist and political critic. His theory of language structure, transformational generative grammar, superseded the behaviourist view of Bloomfield
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On the Chomskyan view, there is a disjunction between Level 1 and Level 2 accounts of function.
In Chomskyan linguistics, set-theory has the status of a metalanguage (thus, our (b) set), as Chomsky himself acknowledges:
Chomskyan linguistics is directed toward examining the ways in which an innate mental language organ can produce the diversity of human languages.
The implications of the developments outlined in the preceding sections of this paper suggest a growing need for a research agenda on Chomsky's ideas about the language system as a whole, his transformational syntax, his focus on the cognitively represented competence of (native) speakers, and the Chomskyan view of first language acquisition.
It might be noted at this point, that Higginbotham's approach, in comparison to the Chomskyan paradigm, considerably extends the scope and aims of linguistic theory.
3-35 passim, which works out the implications of the Chomskyan linguistic-cognitive approach for human cognitive capacities other than language, such as the cognitive capacities for vision, musical appreciation and culture (social organization).
"Rules and Representations: Chomsky and Representational Realism." The Chomskyan Turn.
(7.) The classic reference is Chomsky (1957), but it will be apparent that distinction need not be cashed out in Chomskyan terms.
With the minimalist approach, generative syntax--the framework in which much of the work on Romance auxiliary choice is being carried out at present--has backed off from the original Chomskyan motto proclaiming the autonomy of syntax, which formed the main thrust of (early) generative grammar.
Consistent with the deterministic confidence of linguists generally, most theorists have simply adopted the general Chomskyan assumption that "performance" is irrelevant and that discoverable, systematic rules govern the stress patterns of utterances, just as similar rules govern their syntax.
The goal of this paper is to show that the view (generally adopted in the field of Chomskyan Generative Grammar over the past twenty years) that the semantic function of verbal arguments can be couched in terms of the traditional thematic roles (Agent, Theme, etc.) has led to unsatisfactory results and has proved to be specially faulty in predicting the syntactic realisation of arguments (linking).
It seems to me that Pollock has very successfully achieved his aim of offering an overview of the essential features of contemporary Chomskyan syntactic theory for the beginning student or lay reader.