Chordophone


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Chordophone

 

the general name for a musical instrument whose tone-producing element is a taut string. Chordophones are divided into plucked stringed instruments, such as the lute, mandolin, harp, dutar, balalaika, and harpsichord; bowed stringed instruments, such as the violin and viola; and hammered stringed instruments, such as the dulcimer and piano.

References in periodicals archive ?
The whole collection, a total of 161 musical instruments including examples of aerophones, chordophones, membranophones and idiophones, unfortunately cannot be opened to the public.
In the Archaic and Classical periods a number of texts indicate that the [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] was a plucked chordophone with many strings, characterized by the playing of octave concords or the echoing of the melody at octave intervals.
Finally, the chordophones are instruments in which the sound is made by the vibration of strings, as in folk harp, zithers, violins, pianos.
In this period of "profound cultural change," it is surprising to note the paucity of chordophones.
Coptic lutes" are chordophones with a long neck and a relatively small body, dating from Egypt's late antiquity (third to ninth centuries A.
Sebastian Virdung and Martin Agricola in the sixteenth century divided the families into three major categories (further divided into four subcategories): chordophones (with keyboards, without keyboards, fretted and unfretted), aerophones (subdivided further as with finger holes, without finger holes, blown by bellows), and idiophones.