naevus

(redirected from Choroidal melanoma)
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naevus

(US), nevus
any congenital growth or pigmented blemish on the skin; birthmark or mole
References in periodicals archive ?
The changes in protein profile when a nevus changes into a choroidal melanoma were investigated by Bande et al.
Local recurrence of choroidal melanoma may result in extraocular extension and massive bulbar conjunctiva involvement [13].
Ocular melanoma, also known as uveal or choroidal melanoma, develops in the uvea, or uveal tract, of the eye, and is a rare and aggressive eye cancer.
Fundoscopy generally reveals similar findings in CHRRPE and choroidal melanoma. Some cases were reported who had undergone enucleation because of prediagnosis of choroidal melanoma but had pathological diagnosis of CHRRPE later.
Sections of choroidal melanomas were graded semiquantitatively for KAI1 expression based on the intensity (negative = 0; mild = 1; strong = 2) and extent (negative = 0; focal, <30% of cells positive = 1; diffuse, >30% of cells positive = 2) of staining.
A choroidal melanoma usually presents as a sessile or dome-shaped mass located under the retina and is visualized by indirect ophthalmoscopy and fluorescein angiography, as illustrated in Figure 2.
However, upon examination the hospital specialist discovered the tumour and diagnosed a choroidal melanoma.
The described differential diagnosis includes combined hamartoma of retina and RPE, congenital hyperplasia of RPE, choroidal melanoma, choroidal nevus, and reactive RPE hyperplasia.
One month later, the patient returned to the practice to inform the author that she had been diagnosed with having a choroidal melanoma. She has since had enucleation of the right eye and a prosthetic eye has been fitted.
The chief concern about naevi is that of transformation to, or confusion with, choroidal melanoma. Important features in this regard are: documented increase in size or thickness; the accumulation of orange pigment (lipofuscin) on the surface of the lesion; a large area of serous retinal detachment; photopsia in association with a suspiciously large lesion.
The second case was a clinically occult, small (5 mm in diameter) peripheral choroidal melanoma arising in a patient with Parkinson disease.