Chorology


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Related to Chorology: chronology, Chrysology

chorology

[kə′räl·ə·jē]
(ecology)
The study of how organisms are distributed geographically.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Chorology

 

the branch of biology that studies various biological phenomena in a spatial perspective. Phytochorology, or plant chorology, is the branch of plant geography concerned with the geographic distribution of species and other taxa of the plant kingdom; zoochorology deals with the distribution of animal taxa. Usually individual species or genera are studied.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
(2) Chorology. On Beginning in Plato's Timaeus, Bloomington 1999.
Floristic Composition, Life Form and Chorology of Plant Life at Al-Saoda, Asir Region, South-Western Saudi Arabia.
In order to think of the chora in Castoriadis' philosophy the psychic life of a person needs to be situated within the overall chorology of the social-historical domain.
A presentation of some aspects of the application of neosigmatiste method in pedology, systematics and chorology. Iranian J.
Except for Gunnera and Oreomyrrhis, molecular phylogenies support the earlier chorology based ideas about origins of southern genera in paramo.
Compare John Sallis, Chorology: On Beginning in Plato's Timaeus (Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 1999), 150-4.
For example, shrubs are ubiquitous in floristic studies (Griffiths, 1981), in chorology (Takhtajan, 1986) and as fuel for rejuvenation (Forman, 1979; Abrahamson, 1984; Menges and Kimmich, 1996; van Auken, 2000).
This volume collects botanical data on the taxonomy and chorology of species of the largest families of Compositae or Asteraceae (the aster, daisy, or sunflower family) of the Holarctic ecozone, which comprise 92 genera and 558 species found in Siberia, including a number being described for the first time.
Geographers should fault themselves for not having tried to make "chorology" an everyday word.