Chremonidean War


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Chremonidean War

 

a war lasting from 267 B.C. to 261 B.C. between Macedonia and some of the Greek poleis under its sway. The Greek forces, which consisted of armies from Athens, Sparta, other former members of the Peloponnesian League, and Epirus, were supported by Egypt. The Chremonidean War took its name from Chremonides, an Athenian who helped instigate the conflict.

In the end, the Greek city-states were defeated. The Macedonians seized Corinth and routed the Spartans on the Isthmus of Corinth. In 263–262 the Macedonians laid seige to Athens and, despite prolonged resistance by the Athenians, occupied the city and the harbor of Piraeus. Athens was placed under a Macedonian vicegerent. In 261, Chremonides fled to Egypt. The anti-Macedonian alliance disintegrated, and the supremacy of Macedonia was strengthened.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The very first coins of the Lakedaimonians were the silver tetradrachms struck by Areus I in 267-265 B.C.: the intended recipients were his mercenaries during the Chremonidean War. (4) The legend, naming King Areus as the issuing authority (basileos Areos), clearly imitated the coinage of Alexander's successors, with the title basileus carrying dynastic connotations beyond the local significance of Spartan kingship.
(30) There were two portrait statues of Areus I at Olympia, the first presented by the Eleans, the second by Ptolemy II, his ally in the Chremonidean War. The latter was probably set up in 266 B.C., and was strategically positioned not far from portraits of Ptolemy I, Antigonos the One-Eyed, and his son, Demetrios Poliorketes.
The occurrence in book one comes as part of an excursus centred on the activities of Pyrrhus, within which Hieronymus of Cardia is explicitly mentioned as a source by Pausanias.(41) For Areus, the source seems to be focused more on the role of Athens in the Chremonidean War than on Sparta.(42) The description of Areus' reign (309-265) begins with Antigonus' assault on Athens (3.6.4) and ends with his withdrawal of the Macedonian garrison (3.6.6).