Christine de Pisan


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Christine de Pisan:

see Pisan, Christine dePisan, Christine de
, 1364–c.1430, French poet, of Italian descent. She wrote many verse romances and works in prose, as well as the lyric poems for which she is most famous. Remarkable in character and learning, Christine sought to express the dignity of woman.
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Pisan, Christine de

(krēstēn` də pēzäN`), 1364–c.1430, French poet, of Italian descent. She wrote many verse romances and works in prose, as well as the lyric poems for which she is most famous. Remarkable in character and learning, Christine sought to express the dignity of woman. Her writings include Le Livre des fais d'armes et de chevalerie, first translated and printed by Caxton as The Book of Fayttes of Armes and of Chivalrye (1489; new ed. 1932) and Le Livre du duc des vrais amans (tr. The Book of the Duke of True Lovers, 1908).
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Christine de Pisan

?1364--?1430, French poet and prose writer, born in Venice. Her works include ballads, rondeaux, lays, and a biography of Charles V of France
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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(26.) From Maurice Roy, Oeuvres poetiques de Christine de Pisan, 3 vols.
She begins with the noted author Christine de Pisan, known more in England for her wisdom books than her feminist treatises.
For example, Gabrielle Suchon, Harriet Taylor, Mary Wollstonecraft, Blaise Pascal, Christine de Pisan and Simone de Beauvoir all (indirectly) broach the question of the unthought and allow hope for change in epistemology and social conditions.
Philippe de Mezieres, Eustache Deschamps, Honore Bovet, and Christine de Pisan are the poets.
AD Of all the books that interest me, or to mention one in particular, I'm currently reading Rabelais and Christine de Pisan. After that I plan on turning to a number of contemporary African authors.
In contrast to these metacritical authors, as Lorna Jane Abray's essay shows, Christine de Pisan appropriates Troy's fall quite pointedly as an exemplum; over the course of her career, Christine repeatedly evokes Hector and his fate as a warning to the powerful dukes of her own time, whose lack of self-control might otherwise lead to "a kingdom-ruining holocaust comparable to the fiery destruction" of Troy.
One can laugh at the bit with which the book opens, an outdated literary historian calling Christine de Pisan an "insufferable bluestocking." But it is harder to swallow the fact that a roomful of 17th-and 18th-century specialists gathered at the Sorbonne at the end of the 20th century had never heard of Mary Wollstonecraft and derided the idea of including her in an exhaustive reference work; or to understand how a recent book called The Renaissance Notion of Women could include nothing actual Renaissance women said or did.
Herring-seller or "harangere" in French recalls the term, "harangue"--"public speech"--that Christine de Pisan is credited with having invented.
Gourlay, 69-102, who quite correctly refers to this beautiful needlework with its vexed patronage history as an example of the power-of-women genre, but is this necessarily the power of young women?); and a few citations to Christine de Pisan scattered throughout, this is primarily a volume about maidens in medieval England and the views of medieval English writers on them.