Chromated copper arsenate


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Chromated copper arsenate

Type of wood preservative that has now been largely eliminated from residential wood products because of concerns about leaching and toxicity. Huge quantities of chromated copper arsenate treated wood remain in use, especially in residential decks.
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The effects of chromated copper arsenate and ammoniacal copper zinc arsenate on shear strength development of phenolic resin to Sitka spruce bonds.
Before 2004, wood decks had been treated mainly with chromated copper arsenate (CCA).
Petition to ban chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood in playground equipment (Petition HP 01-3).
Chromated copper arsenate wood preservatives were withdrawn from the market for residential use in 2003.
The phasing out of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) in wood preservation will continue to benefit monoethanolamine as the two leading alternatives both make extensive use of the chemical.
Before 2004, chromated copper arsenate (CCA) was the preservative most commonly used to prevent pest infestation of construction wood.
This collection of 26 papers cover environmental impacts, assessment and management of human health risks, and end-of-life management and impacts with such topics as the impact of chromated copper arsenate, production and management in Europe, Asia and Oceania, study designs for environmental impacts, leaching of chemicals and the impact on the soil, modeling for leaching of inorganic components, effects on soil and water, the cost of human exposure to chromated copper arsentate, methods of evaluating contamination, risks to children, identification and disposal of treated woods, biomediation through bacteria and other removal techniques, and disposal in landfills.
Treated Wood in Transition: Less Toxic Options in Preserved and Protected Wood" surveys the regulatory, legal and business aspects of what has happened in the treated wood market since chromated copper arsenate (CCA) was taken off the market in early 2004.
Though chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood was phased out of residential use in 2003, arsenic from wood already in use will likely leach into the environment for years to come, possibly threatening groundwater.
Mixed C&D recyclers have also been striving to keep wood treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA) out of their end products for several years, as the arsenic contained in CCA is undesirable in boiler fuel shipments and in mulch.
Chromated copper arsenate (CCA) was widely used as a treatment against rot and insect damage until it was eliminated from use on residential wood on December 31, 2003.