Chromated copper arsenate


Also found in: Acronyms, Wikipedia.

Chromated copper arsenate

Type of wood preservative that has now been largely eliminated from residential wood products because of concerns about leaching and toxicity. Huge quantities of chromated copper arsenate treated wood remain in use, especially in residential decks.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
In the Korean preservation industry, however, chromated copper arsenate (CCA) is still used to treat Douglas-fir.
Southern pine samples were treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA) and Douglas-fir samples were treated with ammoniacal copper zinc arsenate (ACZA), to target retentions of 0, 9.6, 16, 24, 40 kg/[m.sup.3] (0, 0.6, 1, 1.5 or 2.5 pcf) as determined by weight.
The aim of the research was to assess whether dimensional stability and resistance of the treated wood to microbial attack and fire was comparable to that of wood treated with a hydrophobic chromated copper arsenate preservative (CCA-wax).
Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) sapwood specimens, 2 by 2 by 2 cm, were previously treated with 0.6 percent chromated copper arsenate Type C wood preservative (CCA-C) solution using a vacuum process.
If your deck was built before 2004, it could have been made with chromated copper arsenate, which contains arsenic.
Older pallets could have been pressure treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA), which has been phased out for many residential uses.
Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCA) has been employed extensively since the 1930s as a wood preservative [1-3] to protect structures such as utility poles, fence posts, backyard decks, playground equipment, and marine structures from fungal and bacterial attack.
For many years, most outdoor structures were built with pressure-treated wood that had been soaked in chromated copper arsenate (CCA).
They are treated with pentachlorphenol, chromated copper arsenate, creosote or copper azole with severe environmental consequences.
The site became contaminated after decades-long wood-treating activities using chromated copper arsenate (CCA).
“Prior to 2004, lumber was treated predominantly with CCA (chromated copper arsenate).
Abstract Pressure-treated lumber available for residential applications had been changed from chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treatment to Cu-amine formulations (since January 2004).