Chrysostom


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John Chrysostom, Saint

John Chrysostom, Saint (krĭsˈəstəm, krĭsŏsˈ–) [Gr.,=golden-mouth], c.347–407, Doctor of the Church, one of the greatest of the Greek Fathers. He was born in Antioch and studied Greek classics there. As a young man he became an anchorite monk (374), a deacon (c.381) and a priest (386). Under Flavian of Antioch he preached brilliantly in the cathedral for 12 years, winning wide recognition. In 398 he was suddenly made patriarch of Constantinople, where he soon gained the admiration of the people by his eloquence, his ascetic life, and his charity. His attempts to reform the clergy, however, alienated many monks and priests, and the court of the Roman emperor of the East came to resent his denunciation of their ways. He lost favor when he demanded mercy for the dishonored Eutropius and when he refused to condemn without a hearing certain monks accused of heresy. Empress Eudoxia and Theophilus, bishop of Alexandria, succeeded in having St. John condemned (403) by an illegal synod on false charges. The indignation of the people was reinforced by an opportune earthquake, and the superstitious Eudoxia had St. John recalled. He continued to attack the immorality of the court, and Emperor Arcadius exiled him to Cucusus in Armenia. There he continued to exert influence through his letters, and Arcadius moved him to a more isolated spot on the Black Sea. St. John, already ill, died from the rigors of the journey. Although not a formal polemicist, John Chrysostom influenced Christian thought notably. He wrote brilliant homilies, interpreting the Bible literally and historically rather than allegorically. His treatise on the priesthood (381) has always been popular. His sermons and writings, remarkable for their purity of Greek style, afford an invaluable picture of 4th-century life. His influence was already great in his own day, and the pope withdrew (406–16) from communion with Constantinople because of his banishment. In 438, St. John's body was returned to Constantinople, and Emperor Theodosius II did penance for his parents' offenses. His accomplishments as a preacher and theologian are marred by a virulent anti-Semitism. John Chrysostom was not the author of the liturgy that bears his name. In 1909, Pope Pius X declared him patron of preachers. Feasts: in the Eastern Church, Sept. 14, Nov. 13, and Jan. 27; in the Western Church, Jan. 27.
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Chrysostom

Saint John. ?345--407 ad, Greek patriarch; archbishop of Constantinople (398--404). Feast day: Sept. 13 or Nov. 13
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
One can thus, for example, examine the specifically spiritual, genealogical, sociological, and other differentiated aspects of Bucher, Spicer, Underwood, Chrysostom, Lee, and Selwyn, while also understanding those individuals as integrated human beings.
Funeral on Monday 13th April, 2015 at St John Chrysostom C of E Church, Queens Road, L6 at 1.45 p.m.
The most commonly used Divine Liturgy of the Orthodox Church was written by Saint John Chrysostom (347--407 A.D.).
John Chrysostom and the memory of living saints (like Bl.
John Chrysostom Church, 4750 Washington St., West Roxbury, at 10 a.m.
This exploration of the Early Fathers' thought on work concentrates on Basil of Caesarea, John Chrysostom, Ambrose of Milan, and Augustine as major figures that laid the foundations of an idea of work that is at the same time theological and ethical-political.
The topics include Paul's Narratio (Gal 1:13-2:14) as response to the Galatian conflict, the use of Isaiah 28:11-12 in 1 Corinthians 14:21, controlling the narrative surrounding the deposition of John Chrysostom, Zosimus and the Gallic churches, Christian-Jewish conflict in light of Heraclius' forced conversion and the beginning of Islam, and John of Damascus and Theopanes the confessor as examples of the earliest Greek understanding of Islam.
Johannes Freyer, in "L'Agostinismo e i francescani" (65-72), analyzes the appreciation of Augustine in early Franciscans and especially in Bonaventure, while Maria Grazia Mara, in "Agostino e alcuni padri greci: Origine e Giovanni Crisostomo" (22743), offers a comparative perspective about interpretations of Galatians 2:11-14 by Augustine, Origen, and John Chrysostom. Another comparative analysis of Augustine and Simon the New Theologian comes from Panaghiotis Yfantis's "La dolcezza di Dio in Agostino d'Ippona e Simeone il Nuovo Teologo: Letture parallele" (97-115), as well as from Fotios Ioannidis's "La grazia divina in sant'Agostino e nella tradizione patristica orientale" (155-65), which compares the roles of freedom and grace in Augustine, John Chrysostom, and Diadochus of Photice.
At the service at St Chrysostom's Church, in Victoria Park, Manchester, where Mrs Johnson was a parishioner and Keith attended Sunday school, the names of her son's killers were never uttered once.
Yesterday's service was at St Chrysostom's Church, in Victoria Park, Manchester, where Mrs Johnson was a regular parishioner and where Keith had attended Sunday school.
The funeral took place at St Chrysostom's Church in Victoria Park, and was attended by family, friends and those who had been touched by Mrs Johnson's plight.
Canon Ian Gomersall, of St Chrysostom's Church, in Victoria Park, Manchester, said Winnie's funeral would be on Thursday next week.