Chukchi Peninsula


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Chukchi Peninsula

(cho͞ok`chē), northeastern extremity of Asia, terminating in Cape Dezhnev, Russian Far East. Washed by the E Siberian and Chukchi seas in the northeast, the peninsula is the eastern extension of the Anadyr mountain range. It is also known as Chukotsk. It is included in the Chukotka Autonomous Area (1990 est. pop. 155,000). The capital is the city of AnadyrAnadyr
, river, c.695 mi (1,120 km) long, rising on the Anadyr Plateau, NE Russian Far East, and flowing S then E into Anadyr Bay, an inlet of the Bering Sea. The Anadyr basin, a lowland between the Anadyr and Koryak ranges, is mostly covered by tundra.
..... Click the link for more information.
. A large portion of the inhabitants are Russian; the rest are Chukchi, Yakut, Eveny, Koryak, and Inuit. The Chukchi language is of the Paleosiberian family (see Paleosiberian languagesPaleosiberian languages
, also called Paleoasiatic or Hyperborean languages, family of languages spoken by about 15,000 indigenous inhabitants of Siberia. Of these, most live in extreme NE Siberia, and fewer than 1,000 live farther W near the Yenisei River.
..... Click the link for more information.
). The people are of two groups, seminomadic hunters and coast-dwelling fishermen. The area's coastline lies along the North Sea shipping route. There is mining (tin, lead, zinc, gold, and coal), hunting and trapping, reindeer raising, and fishing. The area was separated from the Magadan region in 1992 and put under the direct jurisdiction of Russia, the only autonomous area to be so constituted.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Chukchi Peninsula

 

a peninsula in northeast Asia, in Magadan Oblast, RSFSR. Washed by the Anadyr’ Gulf of the Bering Sea and by the Chukchi Sea, it is separated from North America by the Bering Strait. On the mainland, the boundary of the peninsula runs through the valley of the Vel’mai River to the Chukchi Sea, the banks of which are strongly indented, with Koliuchin Guba in the north, the Mechigmen Gulf in the southeast, and the Krest Gulf in the southwest. At the northeast end of the Chukchi Peninsula is the Dezhnev Cape. The Chukchi Highlands occupy much of the peninsula.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The only part of the Arctic coast not surveyed was the north coast of the Chukchi Peninsula from about 100 km east of the mouth of the Kolyma River to the Bering Strait; to make up for this to some extent, however, an overland route was surveyed from the mouth of the Kolyma to that of the Anadyr'.
Matthew Island in late August 1851, and Captain Abraham Pierce (1854) of the Kutusoff reported that bowheads were taken in the western part of the Gulf of Anadyr in July 1853; others were reported captured on the south shore of the Chukchi Peninsula in Holy Cross Bay (Zaliv Kresta) in June 1866 (Hegemann, 1890:410-412).
Scammon, the famous whaleman-scientist, noted that the native inhabitants of the Chukchi Peninsula reported that bowheads were usually seen in the bays on the south side of the peninsula in autumn, when the ice was beginning to form (Scammon, 1874:67).
This is why the estuary of this river, where this archaic Russian population lives, is known as the "Russian mouth." In the lower Kolyma, another mixed-race population, descended from Russian colonists and Yukaghir, occupies a small stretch of the riverbanks near the mouth, and they are known in the Chukchi Peninsula as Kolimchan and Markovets.
Of all the peoples living in the Americas, the true tundra people are the Eskimo or Inuit, who live in the northernmost tips of North America, Greenland, and the Chukchi Peninsula, in Siberia, together with the Aleutians, who live in Alaska, the Aleutian Islands, and Kommandorski Island.
The reverse appears to occur along the Chukchi Peninsula; Russian natives noted the appearance of large numbers of mothers with calves in late March and early April followed by immature and adult animals (Bogoslovskaya et al., 1982).
In addition, inhabitants of the Chukchi Peninsula conducted raids along the Alaskan coast.
This patch occurred at a sharp salinity (proxy density) gradient at about 30 m depth offshore of the Chukchi Peninsula in October 1993.