Churrigueresque style

Churrigueresque style

(1700–1750)
A lavishly ornamented Spanish Baroque style named after architect Jose Churriguera; the style was also adapted in South America.

Churrigueresque style

upper façade of a chapel in the Churrigueresque style
A Spanish decorative style, often used in the late 17th century and the first half of the 18th century, characterized by elaborate and lavish Baroque ornamentation and detailing; named after the Spanish architect José Churriguera (1655–1725); also see Mission architecture, Plateresque architecture, Spanish Colonial architecture.
References in periodicals archive ?
Its ornate exterior, designed in the elaborate Spanish churrigueresque style, abounded with carved bison, steer heads, and allegorical figures playing stringed instruments, while the interior scheme was inspired by John Ruskin's 1841 fairy tale King of the Golden River.
This is a bit of a surprise, since before these California missions were going up, architects throughout Mexico and Spain were going wild with the churrigueresque style in which every square inch of every available surface is decorated with cherubs, angels, and whatever else the artisans felt like carving that day.