Chute


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chute

1. a steep slope, used as a slide as for toboggans
2. a slide into a swimming pool
3. a rapid or waterfall

Chute

 

the simplest conveyor: an inclined plane along which cargoes are moved by gravity.

Chutes for piece cargo have a rectangular cross section, occasionally they are flat (without sides). For bulk, lump, or fluid materials they have a trapezoidal, circular, or oval cross section and are called troughs. Spiral chutes are used to convey cargoes from great heights. Chutes may consist of sections, which, when necessary, can be arranged to branch out in various directions.


Chute

 

an open conduit for the movement of water without pressure.

Chutes made for use in hydraulic engineering are set up along canals or in hydraulic-engineering complexes for timber slides or fish ladders; those made for laboratories are used for teaching and in studying models of hydraulic-engineering structures. Chutes are built of wood, concrete, reinforced concrete, stone, or steel. (Laboratory chutes are made of glass and plastics.) The most common are wooden chutes (used chiefly in regions where wood is plentiful) and reinforced-concrete chutes (used in hydraulic-engineering and land-improvement construction). The cross section of a chute may be rectangular, trapezoidal, triangular, or curvilinear (semicircular or parabolic). Depending on the local topography, hydraulic-engineering chutes are set on smooth ground or on special supports (piers).

N. N. PASHKOV


Chute

 

an inclined mining excavation that does not have a direct exit to the surface and is used to lower various loads by gravity.

chute

[shüt]
(engineering)
A conduit for conveying free-flowing materials at high velocity to lower levels.
(hydrology)
A short channel across a narrow land area which bypasses a bend in a river; formed by the river's breaking through the land.

chute

An open-top trough through which bulk materials are conveyed and lowered by gravity.

chute

chute
i. Short for parachute.
ii. An inflatable slide for the emergency escape of passengers from an aircraft.
iii. A duct for discharging objects (e.g., leaflets or electronic countermeasure items) from an aircraft in flight.
iv. Any passage or slide through which objects are directed, such as an ejection chute or a link ejection chute.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chute Gerdeman will retain its name and Columbus office, as well as its implementation teams.
A categoria masculina por peso de 68 a 80 kg praticou 25,75 [+ or -] 10,22 chutes de ataque, 216 [+ or -] 40 chutes de ataque de 1 ponto, 10 [+ or -] 4 chutes de ataque de 2 pontos, 8,50 [+ or -] 5,04 chutes de contra-ataque, 119 [+ or -] 55 chutes defensivos de 1 ponto, 1 [+ or -] 1 chute com nocaute, 6,67 [+ or -] 4,91 chutes frontal, 25,17 [+ or -] 8,45 chutes semicircular e 1,67 [+ or -] 2,06 chutes com giro.
Jurors also heard that the baby struck a metal deflector plate placed at the foot of the chute to slow down items of rubbish.
The reason she decided to place her baby in the chute may never be known PROSECUTOR ANDREW SMITH RUBBISH
Varying probe styles have been developed, and some are actually flush with the chute wall, but they still are subject to coatings.
The body of mass m that is on a relative motion on the chute feeder is loaded with the following forces:
Former employees Mark Brown and Marc Heaton both told Sefton Coroner Christopher Sumner they had not seen a chute on site when they were there, and had not been involved in erecting scaffolding to support any proposed chute.
Like a ferocious bulletin from an alternate universe--tumbling, pellmell, brilliant and strange--comes this explosive and discomfiting fifth novel by Carolyn Chute.
After placing the bags in the chute, the cleaners simply return to their specific tasks, thereby saving a considerable amount of time.
The low-cost chute is made from 3-foot-wide, woven polypropylene strips stitched in a crosshatch pattern to form 12 legs that give it the look of a giant spider.
Chute Controls announces its energy-saving product, The Bennett.
In analyzing the historical figure of Jesse Mercer as a representative theological leader of his era, Anthony Chute probes into the Calvinistic underpinnings of Mercer's theology and examines how Mercer used his theology to promote missions, education, and cooperative efforts.