Cibber


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Cibber

Colley . 1671--1757, English actor and dramatist; poet laureate (1730--57)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Henly, Esq of the Grange in Hampshire" and the cast included John Verbruggen, George Powell, Colley Cibber, William Pinkethman, Mr.
Even more striking is Cibber's version of 'Corn Riggs are Bonny', which is a closer fit with Ramsay's words than any other vocal source.
This year we had the experienced mezzo Catherine Wyn-Rogers, a veteran of the operatic stage, who nevertheless seemed to be offering some of the vocal simplicity allied to dramatic intensity that Handel's Mrs Cibber must have provided, especially in "He was despised".
In 1745, for instance, when rival productions of Shakespeare's King John and Colley Cibber's adapted version, Papal Tyranny in the Reign of King John, (32) were staged in London, the part of Arthur was played by Maria Mackin and Jane Cibber, aged twelve and fifteen, respectively.
In the case of the tragedies, tragic endings were usually modified, echoing the method used in the Restoration period by Colley Cibber in Richard III, George Granville in The Jew of Venice, Nahum Tate in King Lear and Otway in Caius Marius, based on Romeo and Juliet (see Sen 1964, 90-104).
For instance, in Colley Cibber's version of King John, entitled Papal Tyranny in the Reign of King John (1745), Constance does not disappear but instead is captured while trying to visit her son in prison.
My favourite part of Messiah is "He is despised and rejected of men," not least because of the story of how at the work's premiere in Dublin in April 1742, a local clergyman, Reverend Delaney, was so overcome by Susanna Cibber's rendering of the part that he leapt to his feet and cried: "Woman, for this be all thy sins forgiven thee!" I'm sure Welsh soprano Rebecca Evans will give an equally moving rendition when she joins the Cardiff Polyphonic Choir and the early music ensemble Rejouissance at St David's Hall on Sunday.
Tracing a developmental arc that begins with Colley Cibber's apology for reforming his protagonist in Love's Last Shift [1696] and ends with audience critiques of Benjamin Hoadly for not reforming his in The Suspicious Husband [1747], Gollapudi situates reform comedies as a dramatic genre that bridged the temperamental gap between the libertine comedies of the Restoration and the full-blown sentimental comedies that, with a number of significant exceptions, came to dominate the stage towards the end of the eighteenth century.
These affiliations were highlighted by notorious cases involving performers such as the 1739 criminal conversation trial in which the actor Theophilus Cibber sued a gentleman, William Sloper, for adultery with his wife, the actress Susannah Cibber.
(31) For examples of discourse emphasising the role of nature see Colley Cibber, An Apology for his Life (London, 1740), p.
Indeed, Cibber refused it for his theatre and the famous actor Quin declined to play MacHeath.
Here she gained the patronage of the actor, playwright and later Poet Laureate, Colley Cibber. Determined to make a go of it, she opened a print shop below her lodgings in St James's Street, but soon fell into debt and was incarcerated in a debtors' prison.