Ciborium


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Ciborium

 

originally a drinking vessel; in Christian churches a tabernacle placed under the altar canopy. Later the altar canopy itself began to be called the ciborium; it was usually supported by columns and richly ornamented. The vessel or box in which the Communion wafers are placed is also called a ciborium.


Ciborium

 

in Orthodoxy, a type of church receptacle used to hold the consecrated bread of the Eucharist. Ciboria were usually made of silver and modeled in the form of a Christian church in miniature.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

baldachin, baldacchino, baldachino, baldaquin, ciborium

An ornamental canopy over an altar, usually supported on columns, or a similar form over a tomb or throne.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Females of the genus Sergentomyia usually have armatures and a pigment patch in the ciborium. The abdominal tergites always have recumbent hair.
(95) The only surviving such shrine is the one surmounting the high altar of San Giovanni in Laterano, erected in 1368-70 to house the head-reliquaries of Saints Peter and Paul in the place once occupied by the famed silver ciborium of Emperor Constantine.
The silver belonging to St John's Church, in Snods Edge, Northumberland, is normally locked away when the church is unattended, but last week a silver ciborium was left out by accident and stolen.
The result was the beautiful ciborium that stands today, albeit modified, on the altar of the San Zenobi chapel in the Cathedral.
(8) In "At Mass (1)," Jennings revived this idea in the following lines: "Time ceases when the gold ciborium's lid / Is lifted and Christ comes to us still // As he was at his birth" (New Collected Poems 302).
silverware, a ciborium of the cathedral of Burgos forming part of the
In 1197, when Celestine III showed it and built a ciborium for it, the sudarium was said to possess the features of Christ In 1208, for the first Sunday after Epiphany, Innocent III took it from the confessio of St Peter's, where supposedly it had been for four centuries, alongside St Peter's body.
At the foot of the Magdalene, he saw a jar of oil, prophetic of "the weakness of all our good," (50) not the ciborium as Grunewald intended, and as more than one generation occupied with the Crucifixion's ecclesiastical and liturgical allusions has seen.
Just as an altar, ciborium, and chalice help define the central ritual of the Christian church, so too does the drinking tube, the cup, and the scratching stick define the lodge rituals.
In one of the more memorable scenes Huguette's religious advisers held a ciborium over Leonarde's head, and she was required to lower herself continual ly so that her head never rose above the eucharist within it.
The language of the passage--"wearing a stole," "acolyte," "host," "ciborium"--connects Father McPhee's ministry to the ordained priesthood in a church with an incarnational sacramental theology.
In architectural terms it's known as a ciborium or a reliquary, the decorated box meant to contain the host or the remains of a saint in a medieval church.