Cima, Giovanni Battista

Cima, Giovanni Battista

(jōvän`nē bät-tē`stä chē`mä), c.1459–c.1517, Venetian painter, called Cima da Conegliano. Influenced by Giovanni Bellini and Antonello da Messina, he created many fine altarpieces in the best tradition of Venetian coloring and landscape. Many of his paintings have remained in Venice. There are notable altarpieces of the Madonna and Saints in Vicenza and in Conegliano and one of St. Peter, Martyr in Milan. In the United States he is represented by numerous works, including a Madonna and Saints and St. Jerome (National Gall. of Art, Washington, D.C.); two paintings of the Madonna (Walters Art Gall., Baltimore); and two Bacchic scenes (Philadelphia Mus.).
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Cima, Giovanni Battista

 

(also Cima da Conegliano). Born circa 1459 in Conegliano, Treviso Province; died there 1517 or 1518. Italian Renaissance painter of the Venetian school.

Cima’s early career was influenced by Bellini and Antonello da Messina. Later influences were Giorgione and Titian. Cima’s paintings were characterized by a rich golden palette, majestic simplicity of human forms, and subtle expression of the poetic bond between nature and man. Examples are The Baptism (1494, Church of San Giovanni in Bragora, Venice), The Entry Into the Temple (Picture Gallery, Dresden), and Annunciation (1495, Hermitage, Leningrad).

REFERENCES

Coletti, L. Cima da Conegliano. Venice, 1959.
Menegazzi, L. Cima da Conegliano: Catalogo Mostra di Treviso. Venice, 1962.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.