Cincinnatus


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Cincinnatus

(Lucius or Titus Quinctius Cincinnatus) (sĭnsĭnā`təs, –năt`əs), fl. 5th cent. B.C., Roman patriot. He was consul in 460 B.C. and dictator twice (458 and 439). According to tradition, in his first dictatorship he came from his farm to defeat the Aequi and Volscians, who were threatening the city from the east and southeast. He returned from battle, resigned his dictatorship, and went home to his farm. In 439 he came out of retirement to put down the plebeians. The separation of legend from history in Cincinnatus' story is impossible.
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Cincinnatus

farmer-hero who defeated Rome’s enemies, returned in triumph, went back to his farm. [Rom. Hist.: EB (1963) V, 712]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Cincinnatus

Lucius Quinctius . ?519--438 bc, Roman general and statesman, regarded as a model of simple virtue; dictator of Rome during two crises (458; 439), retiring to his farm after each one
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
After returning from the battlefield to well-deserved glory, Cincinnatus quickly took his leave to go home.
Cincinnatus is excommunicated precisely because he takes one step further beyond the repressive reality grinded out in the materialistic world of the novel by giving voice to his subjective reality.
The comparison of generals such as Washington and Putnam to the Cincinnatus legend represented one of the most important analogies to ancient Rome.
This can be seen, in Invitation, when Cincinnatus's cell is described: "Here the walls of the cell started to bulge and dimple, like reflections in disturbed water; the director began to ripple, the cot became a boat.
(26) Garry Wills, Cincinnatus: George Washington and the Enlightenment (Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1984), 23.
He is about to reactivate his Cincinnatus role and begin the quest to be a citizen-legislator in the United States Congress.
The Return of George Washington, as well-researched and well-told a work of popular history as anything published this year, begins by celebrating this decision of Washington's to be a new Cincinnatus, to surrender his vast military power and retire to the life of a Virginia plantation owner....
The name of the new society was taken from the illustrious Roman general, Lucius Quintus Cincinnatus, who left his farm at the call of his country and led the armies of Rome to victory.
The Guardian's Ewen MacAskill reported that Gore refused to be sucked into the traitor-versus-hero debate, but did acknowledge that he thought Snowden's disclosures, made while using the alias "Cincinnatus," had been "an important service."
Joseph began Cortland-Chenango Rural Services 27 years ago in Cincinnatus, in the heart of central New York State.
Sharon agreed because he liked the image of farmer-general, a la Cincinnatus, the fifth-century B.C.E.
(78) Storming Heaven's opening, narrated by Cincinnatus Jefferson Marcum, exemplifies Giardinas characters' eloquence: