Cinnamaldehyde


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Cinnamaldehyde

 

(also cinnamic aldehyde, β-phenylacrolein), C6H5CH=CHCHO, a fatty-aromatic unsaturated aldehyde; a colorless liquid with the characteristic odor of cinnamon. It has a boiling point of 252°C and a density of 1.110 g/cm3 (at 20°C). It is poorly soluble in water and very soluble in alcohol and ether.

Cinnamaldehyde is a component of many essential oils (cinnamon oil and others). In industry it is prepared by the condensation of benzaldehyde with acetaldehyde in the presence of bases. Cinnamaldehyde serves as an aromatic substance in the manufacture of perfumes and used in the preparation of cinnamyl alcohol; the latter is also used as an aromatic substance.

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com/science/article/pii/S0026049517302123) Metabolism noted that cinnamaldehyde has previously been shown to have an anti-obesity effect in mice, including in preventing hyperglycemia, which is a high blood sugar level.
Antifungal properties of gliadin films incorporating cinnamaldehyde and application in active food packaging of bread and cheese spread food stuffs.
Multiple but different Cys residues have been identified for sensing other covalently modifying substances such as cinnamaldehyde and synthetic Cys-modification reagent N-methyl maleimide (NMM).
Effects of alfalfa extract, anise, capsicum, and a mixture of cinnamaldehyde and eugenol on ruminal fermentation and protein degradation in beef heifers fed a high-concentrate diet.
Chaves et al [27,7] observed no change in rumminal fluid ammonia N concentration of lambs fed with cinnamaldehyde at 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg of DM.
molecules, namely cinnamaldehyde and salicylaldehyde, was tested by
Cinnamaldehyde and cinnamaldehyde-containing micelles induce relaxation of isolated porcine coronary arteries: role of nitric oxide and calcium.
The subjects sniffed aqueous solutions of cinnamaldehyde, methyl cinnamate, citral, citronellol, geraniol and phenyl ethyl alcohol (PEA) at low (1 ppm to 2.
Previous researches have reported the antimicrobial activity of cinnamaldehyde against various isolates of pathogens including Grampositive (S.
Gawkrodger (2), reported patients with oral mucosal diseases are more likely to have demonstrable hypersensitivity to food additives, especially benzoic acid, perfumes and flavorings, especially cinnamaldehyde.
In this family, phenolic compounds such as eugenol and cinnamaldehyde have been reported in Capsicum species and Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.
Ameliorative effects of cinnamaldehyde and ellagic acid on hematological alterations associated with pathophysiology of gestational diabetes mellitus in albino rats.