Cinnamaldehyde


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Cinnamaldehyde

 

(also cinnamic aldehyde, β-phenylacrolein), C6H5CH=CHCHO, a fatty-aromatic unsaturated aldehyde; a colorless liquid with the characteristic odor of cinnamon. It has a boiling point of 252°C and a density of 1.110 g/cm3 (at 20°C). It is poorly soluble in water and very soluble in alcohol and ether.

Cinnamaldehyde is a component of many essential oils (cinnamon oil and others). In industry it is prepared by the condensation of benzaldehyde with acetaldehyde in the presence of bases. Cinnamaldehyde serves as an aromatic substance in the manufacture of perfumes and used in the preparation of cinnamyl alcohol; the latter is also used as an aromatic substance.

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Benzaldehyde is used as key ingredient in the manufacture of certain flavor and fragrance chemicals such as cinnamic acid and cinnamaldehyde.
This may be associated with the existing antagonistic effect between carvacrol and cinnamaldehyde.
The results obtained using pure cinnamon oil were consistent with previous reports and indicated loss of cinnamaldehyde with VTC processing (Wang et al.
Synergistic action of cinnamaldehyde with silver nanoparticles against spore-forming bacteria: a case for judicious use of silver nanoparticles for antibacterial applications.
The release rate of cinnamaldehyde, an active repellent, in the polypropylene was 23 times lower when cinnamaldehyde was microencapsulated.
Contract awarded for Cinnamaldehyde in middle school meals and other additions Ltd
28] Other compounds found in the Patchouli oil include cycloseychellene, patchoulipyridine, epiguaipyridine, guaipyridine, benzaldehyde, cinnamaldehyde, limonene, camphene, a-pinene, 13-pinene, and eugenol [2, 5, 6, 22].
7) Toothpaste has been implicated due to the active ingredients of cinnamaldehyde and carbone piperitone.
Antimicrobial activities of cinnamon oil and cinnamaldehyde from the Chinese medicinal herb Cinnamomutn cassia Blume.
The current study revealed that the compounds cinnamaldehyde and the oxidized form of epicatechin derived from cinnamon extract inhibited tau aggregation in vitro by protecting the protein from oxidative stress.
Isoniazid levels were assessed by the precipitation of plasma proteins with 10% trichloroacetic acid (TCA) solution, followed by derivatisation with 1% cinnamaldehyde and ultraviolet (UV) detection at 340 nm (quantification range 1-25 (g/ml).
To do this, cinnamaldehyde binds to two residues of an amino acid called cysteine on the tau protein.