Cinnamaldehyde


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Cinnamaldehyde

 

(also cinnamic aldehyde, β-phenylacrolein), C6H5CH=CHCHO, a fatty-aromatic unsaturated aldehyde; a colorless liquid with the characteristic odor of cinnamon. It has a boiling point of 252°C and a density of 1.110 g/cm3 (at 20°C). It is poorly soluble in water and very soluble in alcohol and ether.

Cinnamaldehyde is a component of many essential oils (cinnamon oil and others). In industry it is prepared by the condensation of benzaldehyde with acetaldehyde in the presence of bases. Cinnamaldehyde serves as an aromatic substance in the manufacture of perfumes and used in the preparation of cinnamyl alcohol; the latter is also used as an aromatic substance.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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In the previous studies, the separate use of individual EO (eugenol, thymol, and cinnamaldehyde) in an in vitro system has shown various effects, but results were inconsistent with respect to the modulation of ruminal fermentation [2,8,9,11].
(Karadas et al., 2014) found that concentration of carotenoids in liver and coenzyme Q10 is improved when we fed a combination of EOs including carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde and capsicum oleoresin to broiler chickens.
In addition, cinnamaldehyde has antimicrobial properties.
(2007) cinnamaldehyde and eugenol were the major components of the EOs studied and, the authors concluded that these compounds were responsible for the antioxidant and the antimicrobial activity of the EOs studied.
[USPRwire, Fri Sep 28 2018] Cinnamic Aldehyde, also known as Cinnamaldehyde, is an organic compound and is pale yellow liquid occurring naturally in the species of genus Cinnamomum.
The widely used flavours in e-cigarettes are - menthol (mint), acetylpyridine (burnt flavour), vanillin (vanilla), cinnamaldehyde (cinnamon), eugenol (clove), diacetyl (butter), dimethylpyrazine (strawberry), isoamyl acetate (banana) and eucalyptol (spicy cooling).
However, lower concentrations of selected flavors (vanillin, menthol, cinnamaldehyde, eugenol, and acetylpyridine) induced both inflammation and impaired A23187-stimulated nitric oxide production.
They found that the spice chemical cinnamaldehyde impaired the movement of tiny hair-like cilia that project from bronchial cells.
"The research found the oil cinnamaldehyde boosts metabolic health by prodding fat cells to start burning energy--a process called thermogenesis," explained USA Today.
The main component of bark and cinnamon leaf oil is cinnamaldehyde, which exhibits antimicrobial activity against a wide range of microorganisms.