encryption

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encryption

[en′krip·shən]
(computer science)
The coding of a clear text message by a transmitting unit so as to prevent unauthorized eavesdropping along the transmission line; the receiving unit uses the same algorithm as the transmitting unit to decode the incoming message.

encryption

(algorithm, cryptography)
Any procedure used in cryptography to convert plaintext into ciphertext (encrypted message) in order to prevent any but the intended recipient from reading that data.

Schematically, there are two classes of encryption primitives: public-key cryptography and private-key cryptography; they are generally used complementarily. Public-key encryption algorithms include RSA; private-key algorithms include the obsolescent Data Encryption Standard, the Advanced Encryption Standard, as well as RC4.

The Unix command crypt performs a weak form of encryption. Stronger encryption programs include Pretty Good Privacy and the GNU Privacy Guard.

Other closely related aspects of cryptograph include message digests.

encryption

The reversible transformation of data from the original (plaintext) to a difficult-to-interpret format (ciphertext) as a mechanism for protecting its confidentiality, integrity and sometimes its authenticity. Encryption uses an encryption algorithm and one or more encryption keys. See encryption algorithm and cryptography.
References in periodicals archive ?
The simulation results show that the scrambling degree of the encrypted image is high and the correlation between adjacent pixels is small, the anti-aggressively is stronger and the security is higher, through the analysis of the correlation between plaintext and cipher text image, we made a further proof that the encryption image has better effect.
Hidden cipher text message bits are recovered from the palette indices of the closest colour in the palette.
Tokenisation not only addresses the unanticipated complexities introduced by traditional encryption, but can also minimize the number of locations where sensitive data resides given that the cipher text is only stored centrally.
Exclusive OR this intermediate cipher text bits with that of the key K2 to make the cipher text C very complex.
Security metadata and operational encryption keys should be kept in cipher text (even when stored in memory) until needed for use by crypto-services routines.
The aim is to provide increased protection against certain attacks like dictionary attacks and matching cipher text attacks, which exploit the short message-block size of DES.