Circular Accelerator

circular accelerator

[′sər·kyə·lər ak′sel·ə‚rād·ər]
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Circular Accelerator

 

(or cyclic accelerator), a particle accelerator in which the particles repeatedly travel through the same accelerating electrodes and move in orbits that are close to circles or spirals. (SeeACCELERATOR, PARTICLE.)

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The fine beams produced by the 3,622-foot circular accelerator allow scientists to peer inside items as they are functioning, or look at a tiny object such as a protein and break its composition down at the atomic level.
The four stations on the Wirral Line will be used to mirror the four detectors of the real circular accelerator.
Two beams of subatomic particles called "hadrons" - either protons or lead ions - will travel in opposite directions inside the circular accelerator, gaining energy with every lap before eventually colliding with each other.
To do this, they turned to Lawrence Berkeley's synchrotron, a circular accelerator approximately 65 meters in diameter.
So far, the procedure has worked only in a doughnut-size, circular accelerator, which the scientists developed over several years explicitly to determine whether crystal beams were possible.
The European group is building a more conventional but gigantic circular accelerator, at a cost of more than $1 billion.