circular orbit


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circular orbit

[′sər·kyə·lər ′ȯr·bət]
(astronomy)
An orbit comprising a complete constant-altitude revolution around the earth.
References in classic literature ?
For a time he remained crouching, and when at last he looked out again the little town was very small and travelling, with the rest of lower Germany, in a circular orbit round and round the car--or atleast it appeared to be doing that.
The aim was to achieve a circular orbit. Paradoxically this meant setting out initially to achieve an ellipse, which would then gradually be smoothed into a circle as the spacecraft orbited due to variations in gravity in different parts of the moon.
About 3 hours after lift-off, the fourth stage (PS4) of the vehicle was moved to a lower circular orbit of 485 km after two restarts to establish it as an orbital platform for carrying out experiments with its three payloads.
In PSLV-C45, the fourth stage (PS4) of the vehicle will be moved to a higher circular orbit so as to establish an orbital platform for carrying out experiments.
The Kalamsat is a 10 cm size cube and weighs 1.2 kg, it was moved to a higher circular orbit to establish an orbital platform for carrying out experiments using the tiny payload.
The fourth stage will be moved to higher circular orbit so as to establish an orbital platform for carrying out experiments.
"In contrast, the new planet, called Pi Mensae c, has a circular orbit close to the star, and these orbital differences will prove key to understanding how this unusual system formed.
New observations show clumps of gas swirling around at about 30 percent of the speed of light on a circular orbit just outside its event horizon -- the first time material has been observed orbiting close to the point of no return, and the most detailed observations yet of material orbiting this close to a black hole.
According to the report, the two Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd-owned satellites were placed into a circular orbit around the poles, 583 kilometres from the Earth.
When that happens, the larger body feels the combined gravity of the small TNOs piling up behind it, ultimately pushing it out to a more distant and more circular orbit.
The habitable zone is the region around a star where a planet with an Earth-like atmosphere on a circular orbit can support liquid water on its surface.
Finally, as the mass center O reaches to the expected circular orbit, the length of a tether comes back to the original value (Figure 2) and [theta] = [??] = 0